Tsarstvennaia Kniga

Tsarstvennaia Kniga

 

(Book of the Realm), an illustrated manuscript, a copy of part of the Illustrated Codex of Chronicles that records events from the reign of Ivan IV Vasil’evich (Ivan the Terrible) as grand prince and tsar. Some researchers conjecture that the Tsarstvennaia Kniga was compiled in the 1560’s, while others date it to the 1570’s and 1580’s. It was presumably part of a grandly conceived illustrated codex. The Tsarstvennaia Kniga has 1,073 miniatures illustrating the text, which encompasses events of the period 1533–53. The text contains many corrections and notes of sharp political content that substantially change the initial description of events. It has been suggested that these changes were made by Ivan IV himself.

REFERENCES

Polnoe sobrame russkikh letopisei, vol. 13, part 2. St. Petersburg, 1906.
Presniakov, A. E. Tsarstvennaia kniga, ee sostav i proiskhozhdenie. St. Petersburg, 1893.
Podobedova, O. I. Miniatiury russkikh istoricheskikh rukopisei: K istorii russkogo litsevogo letopisaniia. Moscow, 1965. [28—1306–1]
References in periodicals archive ?
In line with Sergei Bogatyrev's focus on the "designs of royal headgear," the zealous editor of Tsarstvennaia kniga ordered a whole series of images from Ivan's minority to be redrawn in order to depict him not in a cap but in a multipronged crown.
Shcherbatov, Tsarstvennaia kniga to est ' letopisets tsarstvovaniia tsaria Ioanna Vasil 'evicha ot 7042 goda do 7061 goda (St.
The illustrations of two other tomes of the LLS, the Tsarstvennaia kniga and the Synodal volume, which depict the events of the early 16th century, consistently show Elena Glinskaia seated together with the young Ivan on a double throne when receiving messengers or foreign dignitaries, issuing orders, consulting with advisers on political matters, or handing out punishments.
(41) The same phenomenon can be observed in Elena Glinskaia's portrayal in the version of the Tale of the Death of Vasilii Ivanovich that is found in the Tsarstvennaia kniga, another tome of the LIS; see Thyret, " Tale of the Death of Vasilii Ivanovich," 222-24.
Volumes 4 and 5 cover the same time period, as do volumes 9 and 10 (better known as the Sinodal'nyi tom [Synodal Volume] and the Tsarstvennaia kniga [Tsar's Book], respectively).
Shcherbatov, who discovered volumes 9 and (still unbound) 10 in the mid-18th century, to all intents and purposes created Tsarstvennaia kniga, selecting out a group of unfinished pages covering 1533-53, noting that the illustrations were not yet colored and that multiple copies of many pages existed but choosing simply to ignore the duplicates and treat the rest as a whole (Amosov, 34-36)--rather than, as Boris Kloss has pointed out, recognizing that they were evidence of that historical rarity, a work in progress, complete with editorial comments and (probably) clean pages, the duplicates and triplicates.
He chastises earlier researchers for ignoring illustrations described by Shcherbatov that would have linked Tsarstvennaia kniga to Fedor Ivanovich's reign and concludes that the LLS as it currently exists represents either an original or an edited text from no earlier than 1586 (254).