Tshombe


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Tshombe

Moise . 1919--69, Congolese statesman. He led the secession of Katanga (1960) from the newly independent Congo; forced into exile (1963) but returned (1964--65) as premier of the Congo; died in exile
References in periodicals archive ?
The Secretary General takes a plane to try and persuade Tshombe to talk peace but he never reaches his destination.
At different times when Tshombe and other politicians from Elisabethville visited Leopoldville, Wa Nsanga using his cousin s Opel to drive them around town, encouraged them to strongly defend Katanga's interests in their negotiations with Lumumba.
by Shikha Vyas-Doorgapersad, Lukamba-Muhiya Tshombe and Ernest Peprah Ababio.
Cesaire's version actually repeats an earlier version of Lumumba's death where the knife thrust is given by Godefroid Munongo, Moise Tshombe's interior minister (Kalb 186).
In July 1960, with the support of Belgian business interests and 6,000 Belgian troops, the province declared independence as the State of Katanga under the leadership of Moise Tshombe. Tshombe was known to be close to the Belgian industrial companies that mined the resource-rich province.
He was on his way to meet Moise Tshombe, the leader of the Katangese secessionist movement.
Because Katanga's anti-communist leader Moise Tshombe announced his intention to resist the takeover of the province by a Moscow favorite named Patrice Lumumba, to proclaim independence, and to have nothing to do with communism.
(27) The Katangan Air Force operated a small number of Fouga Magister jet aircraft, one of which allowed Moise Tshombe (1919-69)'s regime to establish temporary air superiority over Congo, thereby seriously disrupting the operations of the United Nations peacekeeping and peace enforcement forces operating in that country, and compelling the UN to plan and execute a complex air-ground campaign to eliminate the Katangan air threat.
Abd al-Khalig Mahjoub, the late secretary of the Communist Party of Sudan warned in the 1960s that the South Sudanese rebels in their anger against Khartoum might be drawn to the example of Moise Tshombe rather than Patrice Lumumba.
In addition to the current Count d'Aspremont, Brassinne interviews the daughter of Moise Tshombe, leader of the puppet government of Katanga, a state that Belgium briefly set up to maintain control of Congo's richest mining area.
On July 5, 1960, Belgium soldiers occupied the copper rich region of Katanga where they had encouraged a pro-western opposition leader, Tshombe, to secede from the new independent republic of the Congo.