Tsongkhapa

Tsongkhapa

 

Born 1357; died 1419. Founder of the Yellow Hat, or Gelukpa (Gelugpa), Buddhist sect in Tibet, which completed the transformation of Lamaism into a special school of Buddhism.

Tsongkhapa was educated in various monasteries of central Tibet, where he studied primarily Tantrism, a school of Buddhism in which great significance is attached to the person of the teacher (lama) and to secret teachings. In 1409 he founded the Lamaist monastery of Gan-dan, in which he established a complex ecclesiastical hierarchy and introduced ornate rituals. Tsongkhapa was canonized and is a member of the Lamaist pantheon.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kechara Forest Retreat, a 35 acre retreat centre set in the midst of lush tropical forest in the heart of Bentong, Pahang, Malaysia, conceptualised by His Eminence the 25th Tsem Tulku Rinpoche, the founder and spiritual adviser of Kechara Organisation, celebrate Lama Tsongkhapa Day on 23rd December 2016 ( Friday) time 5.
Not surprisingly, then, Duckworth says that there is an often overlooked affinity between Mipam's works and the views of the Gelukpa founder Tsongkhapa.
As the auspicious connection for accomplishing the great objective of the teachings and beings, initially, at the Heart of the Lake, I appeared in the form of Tsongkhapa, blessed your mental continuum, and bestowed the Lamrim.
Yangsi Rinpoche, Practicing the Path 81-96, which is based on the writings of the late 14th-century Tibetan teacher Tsongkhapa.
He said that Marpa, having cultivated Milarepa as a teacher, studied the Madhyamika and the Paramitas and that Milarepa cultivated Je Tsongkhapa as a teacher and studied Lam Rim.
Tsongkhapa (1357-1419) was born in Tsongkha valley and was the founder of the Gelugpa or Yellow Hat sect of Buddhist monks to which the Dalai Lamas belong.
As a companion volume to the author's Tsongkhapa's Six Yogas of Naropa from 1996, this book contains translations of six classical Indian and Tibetan texts, his disciple Pandita Naropa, Lama Jey Tsongkhapa, Gyalwa Wensapa, the First Panchen Lama, and Jey Sherab Gyatso.
The stupa containing the embalming body of Tsongkhapa was attacked and demolished.
In the sparse building two thirds of a way up a mountain he hopes to study the work of the 13th century Buddhist writer Je Tsongkhapa.
In the fifteenth century, the monastic reformer, Tsongkhapa, continued the reforms begun by Atisha - establishing the Gelugpa school, founding the important monasteries of Ganden, Sera, and Drepung, emphasizing pure Buddhist teachings and the practice of virtue - but did not attempt to subvert or reform the older Tibetan Buddhist sects, all of whom coexisted with the Gelugpa and the native Bon.
The translations here include excerpts from the works of Tsongkhapa, historical texts from the time of the fifth Dalai Lama, a selection of love songs by his ill-fated successor, and several interesting and previously unseen translations of political texts on Tibetan relations with the Manchu court and Nepal.
Tibetan philosopher Tsongkhapa, commenting on Nagarjuna, elaborates: