Tsuba


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Tsuba

 

artistically the most noteworthy part of a Japanese battle sword. The tsuba protected the hand and corresponded to the European sword guard. It was usually a round or oval plate with narrow openings in the center. Beginning in the 13th century tsubas were decorated with carved openwork and inlay.

REFERENCE

Sasano, M. Early Japanese Sword Guards (Sukashi Tsuba). Tokyo-San Francisco, 1972.
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Black same appears under the silk tape wrapping and the large, egg-shaped tsuba is faced on each side by ornate dai seppa with a sun ray design.
If the sword doesn't start easily from the scabbard, first make sure there is no retention latch (as found in most military mounts), then grasp the scabbard close against each side of its joint (or the tsuba).
The are three commonly used mounting styles: The tanto with a guard called a tsuba; the aikuchi style with no guard; and the hamadashi style with a small guard.
They were easily carried and rapidly deployed without the potential hindrance of a tsuba. Since the tanto was not used in a fencing type of manner the guard was, for the most part, unnecessary.
There were also sword guards (tsuba) and some rare and beautifully-fashioned inlaid Samurai swords with lavishly decorated scabbards.
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The oval or rounded shapes of sword hilts, or tsuba, and the ornaments decorating them would also inspire Western jewellers to create their smaller scale versions in precious metals and gemstones.
BURMESE cats Tsuba, Kobe and Kira live with their owners, Paul and Susan Leonard in Eaglesham.
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A more surprising success was the $91,000 paid, again by a European collector, for lot 353, an Edo-period copper tsuba or sword hand-guard appealingly formed as an octopus (estimate $2,300-3,000).
The scabbard for a katana is referred to as a saya and the handguard piece was called the tsuba. It is primarily used for cutting, although its curvature allows for effective thrusting.