Tuatha De Danann

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Tuatha De Danann

(to͞o`əthə dā dä`nän), in Irish mythology, invaders of ancient Ireland before the Milesians. They were endowed with great supernatural powers, which enabled them to defeat their predecessors, the Fomors. However, they were themselves defeated by the Milesians.
References in periodicals archive ?
These stories are from people who believed in fairies who descended from the gods of the Tuatha De Danann--creatures who became tiny and began to live under the earth.
Irish children are fascinated by the Welsh stories I share with them, especially those with Irish aspects like Melangell and Branwen - and they tell me stories from their own culture of Cuchulainn, Finn, the Tuatha De Danaan - in return.
At Samhain eons ago, the Tuatha De Danann, forces of generosity, light and order, battled the Fomoire, forces of chaos.
The other follows ancient Irish myth, which says that the Fir Bolg were the rulers of Ireland, well before the arrival of the Tuatha De Danann, the Gaelic gods.
After this peek at the simmering ingredients in the Cauldron of Story, Annie Kinniburgh shows us what use Tolkien made of some elements of Celtic folklore by tracing similarities between Tolkien's Noldor and the Irish Tuatha De Danaan, demonstrating that his Elves owe at least as much to this heritage as to the Norse alfar.
She had failed to win over hurdles or fences before this season, but she got off the mark over fences at Tralee in August, beating subsequent winner Tuatha De Danann by three and a half lengths off an official mark of 72.
There was the mythical Fir Bolg, the Tuatha de Dannan (people of the dawn), the Celts and many others besides, each adding their own individuality and culture.
The Dagda was known as Father of the Gods, the Lord of Occult knowledge, and the leader of the Tuatha de Danaan (children or people of Danu).
a battle for mastery between the armies of Don, the people who appear in Irish legend as the Tuatha de Danaan, "the folk whose mother is Danu," and the armies of Arawn ("Eloquence"), the King of Annwfn, or Annwm, which was the British Underworld or national acropolis.
In times past they were believed to be the habitations of the mythical Tuatha de Danaan race.
Occasionally appearing in furred or feathered guises, the Tuatha de Danaan (People of the goddess Danu) were the defeated deities of Neolithic Ireland, driven by the Celts' own gods into the hollow hills.
Segun el relato de la batalla de Mag Tured, es ese ojo el que hiere de muerte a Nuado, rey de los Tuatha De Danann.