tubal ligation

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Related to Tubal sterilization: tubectomy

tubal ligation

[′tü·bəl lī′gā·shən]
(medicine)
Surgical tying of the uterine tubes to prevent conception.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment of I uteal function after surgical tubal sterilization.
However, with 600,000 hysterectomies and 700,000 tubal sterilizations being performed annually in the United States, prophylactic salpingectomy has been advocated as an attractive opportunity to potentially reduce ovarian cancer risk.
Pelvic congestion syndrome can occur after tubal sterilization leading to the problems11.
Risk factors for tubal sterilization regret, detectable before surgery, Contraception, 1996, 54(3):159-162.
The probability causes of regret after tubal sterilization are young age, decision made by other person, and doing sterilization up to 45th day after childbirth, (6) but menstrual irregularity and dysmenorrhea did not influence regret to a large extent.
Because of the homogeneity of vasectomy clients, we could not examine the association between men's characteristics and their reasons for choosing a permanent method of contraception, reasons for choosing vasectomy over tubal sterilization and sources of vasectomy information.
Perceived alterations in women's menstural flow, length, or pain following tubal sterilization (referred to as poststerilization syndrome) have been debated and studied, but research carried out in the United States has shown no strong evidence for the existence of such a syndrome.
Among 50 patients followed for 10 years after total rollerball endometrial ablation, 2 developed symptomatic cornual hematometras and 3 developed postablation tubal sterilization syndrome (PATSS), he reported at the annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Obstetrical and Gynecological Society.
of user % of users (in 000s) Tubal sterilization 10,727 27.
The first reported tubal sterilization was performed by Samuel Lungren, an Ohio physician, in 1880.
Contraceptive counselors do not recommend tubal sterilization to women seeking a reversible form of contraception, because reversal, which requires removal of the damaged section of the tube and exacting microsurgery to reconnect it, frequently doesn't work.