Tubipora


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Tubipora: Acropora
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tubipora

 

(organ-pipe coral), a genus of eight-tentacled, colonial coral polyps (Anthozoa) of the order Alcyonaria. The foundation of the colony is a skeleton of numerous parallel, dark-red limestone tubules that are up to 20 cm long and are joined by transverse platelike platforms. The corals resemble organ pipes. Inside the tubules are polyps with a bright-green crown of tentacles. Organ-pipe corals inhabit the tropical shallows of the Pacific and Indian oceans, usually among coral reefs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Long Reef: Tubipora. Intertidal and subtidal surveys at Long Reef revealed extensive development of hard coral and soft coral communities.
During a spring low tide surveys of Long Reef we encountered an atypical habitat zone dominated by the Organ Pipe Coral, Tubipora sp.
Point-intercept transects conducted to quantify the percent cover of Tubipora in the zone verified that Tubipora was the dominant benthic organism with a mean of 27.67% ([+ or -] 3.24 SE) cover.
Tubipora was once thought to be a single ubiquitous species: Tubipora musica Linnaeus 1758 (Family Tubiporidae, Order Stolonifera, Class Anthozoa, Phylum Cnidaria) however there are now several nominal species of Tubipora.
Shared among the various nominal species of Tubipora is the distinctive bright red colour of the skeleton.
The sandy materials used in testing sponge selectivity were white polycrystalline quartz with a particle size of 0.25-0.5 mm (BDH laboratory sand); red calcareous sand of the same particle size obtained from the organ-pipe coral Tubipora musica; and fragments of a coralline alga, Lithothamnium sp., 3-5 mm in size.
To test the differences in behavior between the upper and lower surfaces of the sponge ectosome, a thin layer of a mixture (1:1) of the BDH siliceous and Tubipora calcareous sands was laid down on the upper ectosome of five specimens that had attached to the bottom of an aquarium covered by the same mixture.