Tucumán


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Tucumán,

city (1991 pop. 578,579), capital of Tucumán prov., NW Argentina. It is the commercial center of an area that produces sugar, legumes, lemons, and tobacco. The city was founded in 1565 and was moved to its present site in 1685. Spanish royalists were defeated in a battle at Tucumán (1812) by forces under Manuel Belgrano. A congress meeting in the city on July 9, 1816, proclaimed the independence of the United Provinces of La Plata from Spain. In the city are a national university, a popular shrine, and numerous historical landmarks. The city is also known as San Miguel de Tucamán.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tucumán

 

a province in northwestern Argentina, in the foot hills of the Andes. Area, 22,500 sq km. Population, 766,000 (1970). Tucumán is a major sugarcane-growing region. Tobacco, fruits, and vegetables are also cultivated, and raw agricultural products are processed in the province.


Tucumán

 

a city in northwestern Argentina; capital of Tucumán Province. Population, 366,000 (1970). Tucumán is a railroad junction and a major center of the country’s sugar industry. It is one of northern Argentina’s most important commercial cities. Tucumán has machine-building, canning, and leather industries. A university is located in the city. Tucumán was founded in 1565. From March 1816 to April 1817 the city was the site of the National Congress that proclaimed the independence of the United Provinces of La Plata, which in 1826 became the Federal Republic of Argentina.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.