Tudor Revival style

Tudor Revival style

(1910–1940)
A residential style loosely based on English Tudor style architecture; typical elements include asymmetrical massing; steeply pitched, cross-gabled roofs; half-timbered patterns on upper exterior walls; tall, multipaned casement windows; massive chimneys with chimney pots; and Tudor arches. A typically asymmetrical style, with the exterior clad in brick or stucco and employing a false half-timbering treatment. It typically employs steeply pitched gables with little overhang at the eaves; bargeboards on the gables; tall, massive, elaborate chimneys; and narrow casement windows usually set with a number of small, diamond-shaped panes, often within a Tudor arch.
References in periodicals archive ?
The English Tudor revival style structure once served as the central relay station of the city's fire alarm system.
The station's design style has elements of the arts and crafts and Tudor revival styles, typical of railway stations built in the first quarter of the 20th century.