Tuffite

Tuffite

 

a volcanogenic sedimentary rock consisting of volcanogenic material ejected during a volcanic eruption (for example, scoria, ash, pumice, and rock fragments) and sedimentary material mixed with the volcanogenic material. Tuffite may contain rounded fragments of intrusive rocks and also quartz, feldspar, biotite, and organic remains. The cement may be carbonate or argillaceous. Tuffite is used as a building material. (See alsoVOLCANOGENIC SEDIMENTARY ROCK.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Tuffaceous debris and tuffite are widely distributed in sandstone, mudstone and carbonatite lithologies.
The two kinds of volcanic tuff--dolomitic tuffite and silty tuffite--contained quartz, plagioclase and ferruginous debris.
The matrix of the huge limestone slab is mainly some brown-green tuffite. Horny (1955) suggested a transport of limestone blocks from the present-day north or northeast to the south.
Those derived from non-mafic (itabirite, lateritic, and hematiterich rocks, steatite and ferroan-dolomite) and mafic (tuffite, basalt, amphibolite) lithologies are distinguishable in major aspects of their geology, iron oxide mineralogy, and main mechanisms of pedogenesis.
(1993), the boundary interval is characterized by three main facies: (1) volcanoclastics and basaltic rocks with subordinate shallow-water limestones, (2) shales and cephalopod limestones and (3) mostly shale facies with tuffite layers without carbonates.
The flysch series having mixed volcanic material composed of conglomerate, green and black sandstone, shale, marl, limestone, andesite, tuff and tuffite are deposited in the Upper Cretaceous limestone.
Overburden layers reach up to 50 m in thickness; of all, 30-40 m of the profile is represented by tuff and tuffite layers usually several decimetres thick.
Apart from magmatic rocks, the Lower Silesian basaltoid formation includes as well pyroclastic rocks, such as: volcanic breccias, tuffs, and tuffites. The occurrences of volcanic rocks in SW Poland are associated with deep-seated faults, and form "spot-like" concentrations (Cwojdzinski and Jodlowski, 1982; Dyjor and Kosciowko, 1986).
Oil shales in this field alternate with limestone, marl, claystone and tuffites. Oil shales show distinct lamination and schistosity.