Tugendbund

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tugendbund

 

(League of Virtue), a secret political society in Prussia, founded in April 1808 for the purpose of reviving the national spirit after Napoleon’s crushing defeat of Prussia. The Tugendbund had more than 700 members, mostly liberal noblemen, representatives of the bourgeois intelligentsia, and officials not connected with the popular masses. K. vom und zum Stein, G. von Scharnhorst, and A. von Gneisenau were associated with the Tugendbund. The society was officially disbanded in January 1810.

REFERENCE

Stettiner, P. Der Tugendbund. Kônigsberg, Prussia, 1904.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Did the Tugendbund which saved Europe" (they did not then venture to suggest that Russia had saved Europe) "do any harm?
"It is not at all what you suppose; but that is what the German Tugendbund was, and what I am proposing."
The Tugendbund is all vewy well for the sausage eaters, but I don't understand it and can't even pwonounce it," interposed Denisov in a loud and resolute voice.
The context of the modern Enlightenment musical and literary salons that met on jours fixes, hosted by Jewish women, provided a place of culture (Bildung) in which music played an essential place, that promoted a society of virtue (Tugendbund), self education, moral improvement, aesthetic refinement, and intellectual discourse.
However, it was not until 1810 that the Order was revived in what is now Germany, this time under the name of the Tugendbund.
Mirsky, they were directly analogous to contemporaneous groups of disaffected aristocratic youths in other parts of Europe: the revolutionaries in Spain and Naples, the Tugendbund in Germany, and the secret societies in France.