Tuktut Nogait National Park


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Tuktut Nogait National Park

Address:PO Box 91
Paulatuk, NT X0E1N0

Phone:867-580-3233
Fax:867-580-3234
Web: www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/nt/tuktutnogait
Size: 18,181 sq. km.
Established: Established by Parliament in 1998 as a result of an agreement signed in 1996 by the Federal and Northwest Territories governments, and the Inuvialuit.
Location:Part of the Tundra Hills Natural Region in the Melville Hills, northeast of Inuvik. Access is by boat shuttle or on foot from Paulatuk, located 45 km to the west, or by air charter from the town of Inuvik, located 425 km to the southwest. Inuvik is the largest community in the region and is serviced daily by scheduled aircraft from southern Canada. Commercial flights are available from Inuvik to Paulatuk three times a week during the summer months.
Facilities:This is a true wilderness park and visitors are required to be completely self-sufficient. There are no visitor facilities, campgrounds, or established hiking trails.
Activities:Camping, hiking, canoeing, fishing, wildlife viewing.
Special Features: Park protects the calving grounds of the Bluenose caribou herd and its cliffs and canyons provide a nesting habitat for one of the highest densities of birds of prey in North America, including peregrine falcons and golden eagles. The park's arctic tundra and barren lands are also home to populations of musk oxen, wolves, grizzly bears, red foxes, and wolverines. It includes more than 360 archaeological sites.

See other parks in Northwest Territories.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These sites are adjacent to the present-day northwestern boundary of Tuktut Nogait National Park. Mackay (1958) stated that the largest trees, of height unknown to him, had been cut by humans for use as drying poles and other purposes; it is not clear from his writing whether he observed cut logs at all sites, or only at specific sites.
Hunter8965 (CAN) Balsam poplar was not reported in the first major study of the flora of the Melville Hills region (i.e., Paulatuk, Tuktut Nogait National Park and vicinity, adjacent Nunavut), which was conducted as part of a natural resource inventory to determine the region's suitability as a national park (Zoltai et al., 1992).
While collecting plants in July 2009 for a floristic inventory of Tuktut Nogait National Park and vicinity (J.M.
9292, Table 1) was found along the edge of the lower Brock River just outside the boundary of Tuktut Nogait National Park (Fig.