tulipomania

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tulipomania

tulip craze in Holland during which fortunes were lost. [Eur. Hist.: WB, 19: 394]
See: Fads
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The cryptocurrency boom is no more than a 21st-century version of the Dutch tulip mania of the 17th century," Rhyu told the local daily Joongang Ilbo.
A single bulb was reportedly exchanged for 1,000 pounds of cheese at the height of tulip mania. The market collapsed precipitously starting in February 1637, bottoming out in May 1637.
The tulip mania of the 17th century had most definitely waned, but few gardeners, wherever they may live, can resist tulips or daffodils in the springtime.
Rohde continued: "I see bitcoin like tulip mania, like a bubble out of control."
Could bitcoin be the next Tulip Mania? Very likely.
In the face of unhelpful market valuations, critics point to bubbles and investment mania (citing similarities with the tulip mania some 400 years ago when speculation drove the prices to dizzying heights before an equally spectacular fall).
"Going back to the 1600s with tulip mania to the present Bitcoin craze, chasing the next best thing will, more often than not, end in disaster for the average investor."
Throughout the tale several characters (including Jan) also succumb to the tulip mania that took place during the Dutch Golden Age.
Keukenhof itself is on the site of a landscape-designed country estate that was bought and built up by a rich merchant during Holland's "Golden Age" (1588-1702), when tulip mania took root and then ruined many a get-richquick dealer.
Keukenhof itself is on the site of a landscape-designed country estate that was bought and built up by a rich merchant during Holland's 'Golden Age' (1588-1702), when tulip mania took root and then ruined many a get-richquick dealer.
Bilginsoy offers thorough and illuminating accounts of famous "bubbles" throughout Western history, beginning with the Dutch tulip mania of the seventeenth century and continuing through the financial crisis set off by the American real estate collapse in 2007.