Tumblr

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Tumblr

A microblogging website founded in 2007 by David Karp. Noted for its ease of use, people can create short entries and post them in a matter of minutes. Four years after its inception, Tumblr eclipsed the well-known WordPress blogging site in number of users, and by 2013, more than 100 million Tumblr microblogs were hosted. The name comes from "tumblelog," which was a new term coined in the mid-2000s for a short-form blog. In 2013, Tumblr was acquired by Yahoo!.

Between Twitter and WordPress
Tumblr's huge popularity is due to how it fits into the blogging world. Entries can be much longer than Twitter posts, which are confined to 280 characters, but they tend to be smaller than standard blog entries that are often articles about a subject. A Tumblr entry can also be nothing more than a single image. For more information, visit www.tumblr.com. See microblog, Twitter and WordPress.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On tumblr, you will post text, photos, quotes, links, music, and videos from wherever you happen to be in a tumblelog." See Rudiger Lohlker, "Tumbling Along the Straight Path--Jihadis] on tumblr.com," University of Vienna, August 2012.
Simply put, users can sign up for free and post almost anything--text, photos, videos, chats, music, links--to their personal "tumblelog." While one could certainly use Tumblr to post 1,000-word original essays on, say, the latest film by Pedro Almodovar, the platform encourages a certain casualness.
On every Tumblr post there is a "reblog" button that allows one tumblelog's content to be shown on another.
"Tumblelogs are so named because they're much more akin to a stream of consciousness," explained the UK Telegraph in 2007.
Musician John Mayer, actor Aziz Ansari, the Universal Music record label, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Review of Books, Vice Magazine, and countless professional journalists (including, full disclosure, this writer) have tumblelogs.
Blogs have been accused of killing off zincs (though they are still being produced), and tumblelogs seem to channel the spirit of zincs more so than any long-form blog.
The reblog button may currently only be available on tumblelogs, but it's only a matter of time until this quick-and-easy curation function is adapted for the rest of the Internet.
The content on both sites tends towards the geeky, because they were created by geeks, but tumblelog content can cover anything - the important thing is the style of presentation.
A tumblelog dispenses with much of the extraneous stuff that comes with most blogs these days.
A tumblelog's items don't get titles of their own (there's no room for them, and no need), because they speak for themselves.
Tumblelogs are also something of a return to those distant early days of weblogs, back in the 1990s, when they were equally simple and mostly comprised links and nothing but links.
To get your head round the idea, go and look at the earliest tumblelogs, Projectionist (project.ioni.st) and Anarchaia (www.anarchaia.org).