tumor suppressor gene

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Related to Tumor suppression: tumor suppressor gene, tumor suppressor protein

tumor suppressor gene

[¦tüm·ər sə′pres·ər jēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A class of genes which, when mutated, predispose an individual to cancer by causing the loss of function of the particular tumor suppressor protein encoded by the gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
By studying the role of autophagy-regulating gene, it is evident that autophagy plays a pivotal role in tumor suppression, and defective autophagy or autophagy deficiency leads to tumorigenesis like HCC.
2] that stated that genotoxic stress may induce a senescent state, which has a role in tumor suppression and is regulated also by p53.
MicroRNAs have been shown to be involved in the most important cellular processes including apoptosis, and this study helps us better understand their important role in the tumor suppression mechanism.
to retain all the benefits of tumor suppression and yet dispense with all the downsides of having p53.
As an Assistant Professor at the Boston University Medical School, she became interested in the control of cellular senescence and its role in tumor suppression and aging.
The company's lead product candidate ALRN-6924, which is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials, is designed to reactivate p53-mediated tumor suppression by targeting both primary p53 suppressor proteins, MDMX and MDM2.
Despite the potential for tumor suppression, rapamycin's efficacy with respect to growth inhibition differs markedly among various breast cancer cell lines.
Hewitt's research interests include invasion and metastasis of tumors, desmoplastic reaction, proteases and extracellular matrix and tumor suppression genes.
When mammary cells become exposed to a carcinogen, their genomic tumor suppression pathways fail, and the cells become immortalized, or able to reproduce without proper controls.
Linking defects in this gene to prostate cancer is "the first example where RNA turnover is implicated in tumor suppression," says Robert H.
One in 333 breast cancer patients has a detectable BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation involved in tumor suppression.