tumor suppressor gene

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tumor suppressor gene

[¦tüm·ər sə′pres·ər jēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A class of genes which, when mutated, predispose an individual to cancer by causing the loss of function of the particular tumor suppressor protein encoded by the gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
suggested that PTEN "belongs to a class of 'gatekeeper' tumor suppressor genes together with p53, Rb, and APC," a notion corroborated by another article published that same year (3), as well as subsequent publications showing that PTEN+I animals develop abroad range of tumors, including mammary, thyroid, endometrial, and prostate cancers as well as T-cell lymphomas.
Mutation of p53 allows tumours Gl-S boundary, propagate genetic alterations which can lead to other activated oncogenes or inactivated tumor suppressor genes.
We found the tumor suppressor Rb is a critical regulator of the starvation response," said Han, who also is a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator.
By attaching a string of targeting proteins known as ubiquitins to the phosphorylated tumor suppressor, MDM2 marks it for destruction by the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway.
The p53 protein, also known as tumor protein 53 (TP53), is a transcription factor that functions as a major tumor suppressor in mammals.
Introgen is developing molecular therapeutics, immunotherapies, vaccines and nanoparticle therapies to treat a wide range of cancers using tumor suppressors and cytokines.
A drug that could enhance Grasp function might also help enhance the p53 function, and give us a different way to keep this important tumor suppressor working the way that it is supposed to," the researcher added.
By examining the seemingly conflicting roles of how oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes handle cellular stress, scientists from the Institute for Advanced Studies in New Jersey argue that each of these opposing systems could be potent drug targets in the effort to stop cancer.
Both the activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of tumor suppressor proteins are involved in these pathways.
This patent strengthens Lorus' growing intellectual patent portfolio, and complements the company's immunotherapy, antisense, tumor suppressor and U-Sense approaches for designing new anticancer drugs, all of which have recently received patent allowances in major markets.
The patent also covers adenoviral p53 that incorporates a specific type of promoter that helps cells to express the p53 tumor suppressor gene, the key gene in the ADVEXIN therapeutic.