Dunhuang

(redirected from Tun-huang)

Dunhuang

or

Tunhwang

(both: do͞on-hwäng), town, extreme NW Gansu prov., China. Crescent Lake, a noted tourist attraction surrounded by high sand dunes, is there. The Caves of the Thousand Buddhas (Mogao Caves) are at nearby Qianfodong. The town and its environs were long a gateway between central Asia and China, and the frescoes in the caves, painted from the 5th cent. to the 13th cent., show Indian, Greco-Roman, and Iranian influences. Closed for centuries, the caves were reopened in 1900. There, Sir Aurel Stein, an English archaeologist, discovered a library of some 15,000 manuscripts, including the Diamond Sutra, reputed to be the first (A.D. 868) printed book. China reclaimed the caves in the 1940s and in 1979 they were opened to the public. By the 2000s, however, the paintings were threatened by human-generated damage, and now only a few of the hundreds of caves are open to tourists.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch: The Text of the Tun-Huang Manuscript.
The Platfrom Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch: The Text of the Tun-huang Manuscript with Translation.
One wonders whether the method of dealing with aspects related to the imperial period based on later sources is reliable at all or at least in the case they are not dealt with in documents from Tun-huang and other early material.
his Tun-huang Popular Narratives [Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983]), or the contributors to the ongoing Chinoperl Papers (Ithaca, N.
Nonetheless, it should be sought by thorough examination of the textual witnesses, including not only the major Kanjurs, but also local ones, as well as Tun-huang manuscripts and citations in other works.
Other works include The No^O Plays of Japan (1921), Introduction to the Study of Chinese Painting (1923), The Opium War through Chinese Eyes (1958), and The Ballads and Stories from Tun-huang (1960).
Included are both Tibetan translations of the Twenty Verses, edited from three editions of the canon, the seven-verse Heart of Dependent Origination and its auto-commentary, likewise edited, and editions of Tun-huang manuscripts, from the Paris and London collections, of the Heart, its canonical commentary, and an otherwise unknown commentary.
The collection, found in several recensions at Tun-huang, contains seven distinct pieces: a brief biography of Bodhidharma, a short doctrinal treatise (the "Two Entrances"), two letters, and three lengthy "records" containing expositions and exchanges between different monks on various doctrinal subjects.
It is one of the ironies of scholarship that Stein, who had no Chinese and who was interested in China only marginally, insofar as it evidenced the diffusion via Central Asia of Indian thought, should have become most famous for and his name most indelibly associated with the cache of texts he removed from Tun-huang, the bulk of which material was in Chinese and therefore opaque to him but which helped to create a whole new field of Sinology.
The core of the present volume is a translation of the briefer of the two Tibetan versions, the Upayakausalyanamamahayanasutra, itself translated from the Chinese by Wou Fa-ch'eng at Tun-huang during the first half of the ninth century.
Containing in some cases versions of texts even earlier than those found at Tun-huang, and largely representing a version of the canon contemporaneous with the oldest sources for our current editions, the Fang-shan canon, Lancaster believes, is an invaluable source that must be used in any future critical studies of the Chinese canon.
Now with the Turfan (and eventually the Tun-huang and Medinet Madi) discoveries scholars could peruse Manichaean works and form judgments regarding the reliability of the various reports from opponents of the group.