Tungsten bulb

Tungsten bulb

A British term for incandescent bulb, named for the tungsten filament that the bulb contains.
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The reactions were carried out in aqueous 2-methoxyethanol solvent (10 mL:10 mL, v/v) using 200 watt tungsten bulb light.
White flames pour out of blackened apartments; some passages are so bright that one imagines that a tungsten bulb must be hiding behind the picture.
In the absence of flash, a torch can be used with a daylight bulb fitted or the conventional tungsten bulb if you prefer the warmer colour cast.
Each light fixture uses only 600 milliwatts of power and produces about the same light output as a three watt regular tungsten bulb or what a small night light would use.
However, it will still let you read a map or compass up close, or find the car key you dropped in your blind, long after a tungsten bulb light is simply dead.
The Cargo Light provides over ten thousand burning hours in comparison to around five hundred expected from a 21Watt tungsten bulb. Life expectancy has also been substantially increased with the introduction of the Labcraft designed XT circuit.
UV-Vis spectrophotometers typically have a deuterium lamp for the UV range and a tungsten bulb for the visible region.
For all three leaf tissue samples, the calculated leaf absorptance of PPFD from the tungsten bulb and the Bjorkman lamp were lower than the calculated leaf absorptance of PPFD from sunlight.
It is a light equivalent of a 1000 watt tungsten bulb but uses only 38 watts of power at full output.
Use energy-efficient LED (light-emitting diodes) Christmas lights that are up to 90 percent more efficient than tungsten bulbs. LED lights are safer and last longer.
While highlighting in a statement that illumination accounts for between 10% and 15% of a building's energy consumption, Kahramaa explained: "LED bulbs are 10 to 18 times [more] energy efficient than tungsten bulbs, and [reduce] electricity use by nearly 80%."