Tunguska


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Tunguska

(to͝on-go͞os`kə), name of three eastern tributaries of the YeniseiYenisei
, chief river of Siberia, c.2,500 mi (4,020 km) long, central Siberian Russia. It is formed at Kyzyl, Tuva Republic, by the junction of the Bolshoi Yenisei and Maly Yenisei rivers, which rise in the E Sayan Mts. along the Russian–Mongolian border.
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 River, Siberian Russia. The rivers cut across the swampy forests of E central Siberia, draining the Tunguska BasinTunguska Basin,
c.400,000 sq mi (1,036,000 sq km), Krasnoyarsk Territory and Sakha Republic, E central Siberian Russia, between the Yenisei and Lena rivers. It has a huge untapped coal reserve.
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. Furthest north is the Lower Tunguska, Rus. Nizhnyaya Tunguska (nyēzh`nyīŭ to͝on-go͞os`kə), c.1,590 mi (2,600 km) long. It rises in the Central Siberian Plateau N of Lake Baykal and flows past Tura to join the Yenisei at Turukhansk. Flowing generally west, it is navigable (May–October) for c.1,100 mi (1,770 km). The Stony Tunguska, Rus. Podkamennaya Tunguska (pŭtkä`myĭnīŭ to͝on-go͞os`kə), c.980 mi (1,580 km) long, rises west of the headwaters of the Lower Tunguska. It flows generally NW past Baykit; there are rapids in its lower course. Upper Tunguska, Rus. Verkhnyaya Tunguska (vĕrk`nyəyə to͝on-go͞os`kə), is the name given to the lower course of the AngaraAngara
, river, c.1,150 mi (1,850 km) long, SE Siberian Russia, the outlet of Lake Baykal. After leaving the southwestern end of Lake Baykal, it flows north past Irkutsk and Bratsk, then turns west after receiving the Ilim River and flows into the Yenisei River near Strelka.
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 River. It flows generally west and joins the Yenisei at Strelka. The area of the three rivers is the home of the TungusTungus
, Siberian ethnic group, numbering perhaps 30,000. They are subdivided into the Evenki, who live in the area from the Yenisei and Ob river basins to the Pacific Ocean and from the Amur River to the Arctic Ocean, and the Lamut, who live on the coast of the Okhotsk Sea.
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Tunguska

 

a river in Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR; a left tributary of the Amur. The Tunguska is 86 km long and drains an area of 30,200 sq km. Formed by the confluence of the Urmi River (458 km) and Kur River (434 km), it flows in the Lower Amur Lowland. It is fed primarily by rain. The mean flow rate 37 km from the mouth is 380 cu m per sec; the maximum flow rate is 5,100 cu m per sec, and the minimum, 7.25 cu m per sec. The Tunguska freezes in November and opens up in April. It is used for floating timber as far as the settlement of Nikolaevka. There is local shipping on the river. The settlement of Volochaevka Vtoraia is on the right bank.

Tunguska

any of three rivers in Russia, in central Siberia, all tributaries of the Yenisei: the Lower (Nizhnyaya) Tunguska 2690 km (1670 miles) long; the Stony (Podkamennaya) Tunguska 1550 km (960 miles) long; the Upper (Verkhnyaya) Tunguska which is the lower course of the Angara
References in periodicals archive ?
"If the Tunguska object was a member of a Beta Taurid stream ...
The Tunguska event is considered to be the largest asteroid impact on Earth in recorded history.
"We are currently aware of less than 1% of objects comparable to the one that impacted at Tunguska, and nobody knows when the next big one will hit.
The last time anything like the Chelyabinsk event took place was on June 30, 1908, in the area of the Tunguska River in eastern Siberia.
He was interviewed for a Discovery Channel documentary about the Tunguska event of 1908.
Most people with an interest in astronomy will know of the Tunguska explosion which occurred over Siberia in 1908.
The asteroid that exploded over Russia last month was the largest object to hit Earth's atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska event when an asteroid or comet exploded over Siberia, leveling 80 million trees over more than 830 sq miles (2,150 sq km).
At about 17 meters (55 feet) wide, this meteor is alarmingly small by cosmic standards, described by NASA scientists as a “tiny asteroid.” However it is the largest reported meteor since 1908, when an estimated 100-meter (330-foot) meteor - the largest in recorded history - exploded near the Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia.
NASA said the Russian fireball was the largest reported since 1908, when a meteor hit Tunguska, Siberia, and flattened an estimated 80 million trees.
This morning's event is reminiscent of the enormous airburst that occurred over the Tunguska River in Central Siberia in 1908, releasing 1,000 times more energy than was released by the nuclear bomb dropped on Hiroshima.
Computer simulations reveal that if asteroid 2012 DA 14, were to crash onto our planet, the impact will be as hard as the Tunguska blast, which in 1908 knocked down trees over an area of 2,150sq km (830sq miles) in Siberia.