Tunguska event

(redirected from Tunguska blast)

Tunguska event

(tung-guss -kă) A gigantic explosion that occurred at about 7.17 a.m. on June 30, 1908 in the basin of the River Podkamennaya in Tunguska, Central Siberia. Devastation rained over an area 80 km in diameter and eye witnesses up to 500 km away saw in a cloudless sky the flight and explosion of a blindingly bright pale blue bolide. The sound of the explosion reverberated thousands of kilometers away, the explosion air wave recorded on microbarographs going twice round the world. The main explosion had an energy of 5 × 1016 joules and occurred at an altitude of 8.5 km. It was caused by the disintegration of an incoming object, most likely a Fragile Apollo asteroid or a small comet nucleus. When the object encountered the Earth it would have been coming from a point in the dawn sky comparatively close to the Sun and would thus have been most difficult to detect and observe.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Tunguska blast, attributed to a comet or asteroid fragment, is generally estimated to have been about 10 megatons.
According to a report from NASA Science, the Tunguska blast destroyed 800 square miles of remote forestlands, damaged 80-million trees and caused seismic waves that could be felt as far away as England.
Computer simulations reveal that if asteroid 2012 DA 14, were to crash onto our planet, the impact will be as hard as the Tunguska blast, which in 1908 knocked down trees over an area of 2,150sq km (830sq miles) in Siberia.
Effects of the event--often called the Tunguska blast, after a major river running through the area--weren't restricted to Siberia.
A century later, scientists are still debating the cause of the Tunguska blast.
com, Sarasota, FL, has launched Tunguska Blast, a supplement formulated entirely from herbs and other plants harvested in the Tunguska River Valley in Siberia, Russia.
Two other well-known and well-studied events are the June 30, 1908, multimegaton Tunguska blast (S&T: June 1994, page 38) and the February 12, 1947, Sikhote-Alin impact (S&T: February 1997, page 50).
The gigantic Tunguska blast of 1908 should have made headlines around the globe, but there were no intrepid reporters combing the wilds of Siberia able to record what has been called the biggest celestial event in historic times.