Tunguska event


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Tunguska event

(tung-guss -kă) A gigantic explosion that occurred at about 7.17 a.m. on June 30, 1908 in the basin of the River Podkamennaya in Tunguska, Central Siberia. Devastation rained over an area 80 km in diameter and eye witnesses up to 500 km away saw in a cloudless sky the flight and explosion of a blindingly bright pale blue bolide. The sound of the explosion reverberated thousands of kilometers away, the explosion air wave recorded on microbarographs going twice round the world. The main explosion had an energy of 5 × 1016 joules and occurred at an altitude of 8.5 km. It was caused by the disintegration of an incoming object, most likely a Fragile Apollo asteroid or a small comet nucleus. When the object encountered the Earth it would have been coming from a point in the dawn sky comparatively close to the Sun and would thus have been most difficult to detect and observe.
References in periodicals archive ?
That asteroid, known as the Tunguska event, caused an explosion that leveled nearly 500,000 square acres of forest land in Siberia.
To put it into perspective, the meteor that caused the Tunguska event in Russia in 1908 was about 620 feet long, making it around three times smaller than 2006 QQ23.
It was the single largest recorded meteor strike in more than a century, after the Tunguska Event of 1908, which wiped out hundreds of square miles of forest in Eastern Russia.
June 30 is the anniversary of the Tunguska impact, also known as the Tunguska event.
The so-called Tunguska event in 1908 involved an object more than twice as large, at around 50 m.
The United Nations on December 7, 2016 officially recognised the annual and international "Asteroid Day" event that will take place on June 30 of each year, in order to mark the greatest impact in the world recent history on Earth, the Tunguska event in Siberia, which had devastated a forest of more than 1200 square kilometres.
The Tunguska event was 1908; if that rock had hit a major city instead of Siberia, loss of life would have been awful.
In 1908, the Tunguska Event took place in Russia as an asteroid exploded above Siberia, leaving 800 square miles of scorched or blown-down trees.
Impacts as powerful as the famous Tunguska event of 1908, which was comparable to a 10-million-ton blast, should take place every few thousand years.
It was the largest object to hit the Earth since the Tunguska event of 1908, when an exploding comet or asteroid destroyed 2,000 square kilometers of Siberian forest.
Interestingly, the micrometeorite theory as a main source of the dust is growing, and research published in 2009 suggests NLCs that were observed following the Tunguska Event in 1908 are evidence that the impact was caused by a comet.
The resulting shock wave caused widespread damage and injuries, making it the largest known natural object to have entered the atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska event, which destroyed a remote forest area of Siberia.