Tunguska event

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Tunguska event

(tung-guss -kă) A gigantic explosion that occurred at about 7.17 a.m. on June 30, 1908 in the basin of the River Podkamennaya in Tunguska, Central Siberia. Devastation rained over an area 80 km in diameter and eye witnesses up to 500 km away saw in a cloudless sky the flight and explosion of a blindingly bright pale blue bolide. The sound of the explosion reverberated thousands of kilometers away, the explosion air wave recorded on microbarographs going twice round the world. The main explosion had an energy of 5 × 1016 joules and occurred at an altitude of 8.5 km. It was caused by the disintegration of an incoming object, most likely a Fragile Apollo asteroid or a small comet nucleus. When the object encountered the Earth it would have been coming from a point in the dawn sky comparatively close to the Sun and would thus have been most difficult to detect and observe.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was the biggest natural object to have entered the Earth's atmosphere since 1908, when the Tunguska explosion destroyed a forest in Siberia.
Some have suggested that the brightest meteor in recorded history--the several-megaton Tunguska explosion on June 30, 1908--was a Taurid.
In chapter 3 "Close Encounters," Macdougall weaves a compelling narrative around Arizona's Meteor (Barringer) Crater, the 1908 Tunguska explosion over Siberia, and especially the great impact event believed to have triggered the demise of the last dinosaurs as well as hundreds of other organisms that brought the Cretaceous Period to a close.
That modelling directly translated into understanding the Tunguska explosion of the early 20th century and the mystery of Libyan desert glass," said Boslough.
An object that might have been as small as 30 or 40 meters wide created the tremendously powerful Tunguska explosion over Siberia in 1908.
Washington, June 25 (ANI): A new research has confirmed that the mysterious 1908 Tunguska explosion that leveled 830 square miles of Siberian forest was almost certainly caused by a comet entering the Earth's atmosphere.
Burnham turns our attention to the very real danger of impacts from space and the still-somewhat-limited sums of money being spent to detect the kinds of small bodies that created Meteor Crater in Arizona and may have triggered the Tunguska explosion in Siberia a century ago.
The Tunguska explosion is one of the world's greatest mysteries," Brit UFO expert Nick Pope, who headed the Ministry of Defence's UFO investigation team from 1991-1994, said.
FOLLOWING THE TUNGUSKA explosion, unusually colorful sunsets and sunrises caught the attention of observers in western Europe, Scandinavia, Russia, and western Siberia.