Turbidity Factor

turbidity factor

[tər′bid·əd·ē ‚fak·tər]
(geophysics)
A measure of the atmospheric transmission of incident solar radiation; if I0 is the flux density of the solar beam just outside the earth's atmosphere, I the flux density measured at the earth's surface with the sun at a zenith distance which implies an optical air mass m, and Im,w the intensity which would be observed at the earth's surface for a pure atmosphere containing 1 centimeter of precipitable water viewed through the given optical air mass, then turbidity factor θ is given by θ=(ln I0-ln I)/(ln I0-ln Im,w).

Turbidity Factor

 

a quantitative characterization of the transparency of the atmosphere, which indicates the extent to which the transparency of the actual atmosphere under given conditions differs from the transparency of an ideal (ideally clean and absolutely dry) atmosphere. There are a number of turbidity factors. The most widely used is the Linke turbidity factor, Tm ═ in pm/ln qm, where pm and qm are the transmission coefficients of the actual and ideal atmospheres, respectively, with an atmospheric mass of m (a dimensionless quantity characterizing the atmospheric “mass” through which the beam passes).

References in periodicals archive ?
A set of simple formulas links different broadband optical parameters like the Bouguer coefficient of transparency, transmittance, optical depth, the Linke turbidity factor (Ohvril et al.
2] enables easy calculation of two important broadband parameters of atmospheric turbidity--the Linke turbidity factor and the broadband optical depth (Okulov et al.
It also allows the detection of suspended minerals, and the measurement of turbidity factors.