Turgenev


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Turgenev

Ivan Sergeyevich . 1818--83, Russian novelist and dramatist. In A Sportsman's Sketches (1852) he pleaded for the abolition of serfdom. His novels, such as Rudin (1856) and Fathers and Sons (1862), are noted for their portrayal of country life and of the Russian intelligentsia. His plays include A Month in the Country (1850)
References in periodicals archive ?
Hemingway was immersed in Turgenev during his apprentice years in Paris, and it is not hard to read the stories in In Our Time (1925) as sportsman's sketches themselves.
Livak seems to be saying that Russian writers such as Turgenev and Chekhov were actually deeply committed to antisemitism, but distorted their hatred of Jews under the pressure of the dominant liberal opinion of the time.
2008), The Ridiculous Jew: The Exploitation and Transformation of a Stereotype in Gogol, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky.
On his list of greatest books, Druzhinin's story is found next to works by Sterne, Rousseau, Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev and Lermontov.
4) For Hemingway to read a Russian author such as Turgenev in French would not be unusual.
Ivan Turgenev, Five Short Novels [NY: Bantam, 1961]: 297).
He gives an extended chapter to each of what he calls the "cross-rivalries": chapter 1, Erasmus and Luther: First and Foremost, a Pattern Established (73 pages); chapter 2, Voltaire and Rousseau: Never a Peace (88 pages); chapter 4, Turgenev and Dostoevsky: 'What Is There in Common?
Erasmus, Voltaire, Turgenev are--very high-grade--lightweights, who run off before the Future with their tails between their legs, defeated by the personal potency and the historical instrumentality of their agonistic nemeses, Luther, Rousseau, Dostyoevsky.
I recognized distinct similarities between the astutely aware Turgenev and Stoppard himself, which helped me find Turgenev's voice.
Herzen, despite his belief in the justice of socialism and his faith (for which Turgenev mocked him) in the sterling qualities of the Russian peasant, was aware--unlike Marx--that socialism is not "history's destination.
He introduced his readers to the works of Thomas Hardy, Ivan Turgenev, Emile Zola, and Leo Tolstoy, whom he held up as models to his compatriots.
Taylor once gave a lecture on Woolf at Oxford, and in Current Biography for 1948, she names Austen, Flaubert, Compton-Burnett, Turgenev, Sterne, and Woolf as her favorite authors (614).