turgor pressure


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turgor pressure

[′tər·gər ‚presh·ər]
(botany)
The actual pressure developed by the fluid content of a turgid plant cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glycerol accumulation leads to water influx through osmotic process for turgor pressure necessary for host penetration.
This occurred due to initiation of osmotic adjustment, especially in DK-4040 and SF-187 via production of compatible solute (Serraj and Sinclair, 2002) by maintaining leaf turgor pressure (Hussain et al.
Wilting of plants refers to the condition where turgor pressure is lost in response to water stress and the leaves become flaccid or 'floppy'.
Elevated concentrations of glucose and fructose due to greater acid invertase activity in leaves could lead to maintain leaf turgor pressure, thus enhancing the probability of survival during a large period of drought stress (Liu, 2004).
Reduction of osmotic potential is considered as a driving force in inducing water movement from the soil into the plant to maintain turgor pressure (Blum et al.
Turgor pressure is what makes salad crisp, or celery and asparagus "snap" when broken, and the lack of turgor pressure in leaf cells results in wilting.
The turgor pressure is the water pressure within each cell.
The multiple effects resulting from allelopathic phenolics include decrease in plant growth, absorption of water, mineral nutrients, ion uptake, leaf water potential, shoot turgor pressure, osmotic potential, dry matter production, leaf area expansion, stomatal aperture size, stomata diffusive conductance, and photosynthesis (Chou & Lin, 1996).
55 MPa, which promotes high turgor pressure for subsequent leaf growth [98].
These systems are based on the sucking of sugar solutions through Parafilm membranes that imitate, to some extent, the penetration of plant tissues and the sucking of sugar-rich content in phloem sieve elements, with high turgor pressure (Benrey and Lamp 1994).