Turing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Turing: Turing machine

Turing

Alan Mathison. 1912--54, English mathematician, who was responsible for formal description of abstract automata, and speculation on computer imitation of humans: a leader of the Allied codebreakers at Bletchley Park during World War II
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Turing

(1)

Turing

(2)
R.C. Holt <holt@csri.toronto.edu> & J.R. Cordy <cordy@cs.queensu.ca>, U Toronto, 1982. Descendant of Concurrent Euclid, an airtight super-Pascal. Used mainly for teaching programming at both high school and university level.

Available from Holt Software Assocs, Toronto.

Versions for Sun, MS-DOS, Mac, etc.

E-mail: <distrib@turing.toronto.edu>.

["Turing Language Report", R.C. Holt & J.R. Cordy, Report CSRI-153, CSRI, U Toronto, Dec 1983].

["The Turing Programming Language", R.C. Holt & J.R. Cordy, CACM 31(12) (Dec 1988)].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Turing Fest is supported by the Scottish Government, Scottish Enterprise and VisitScotland Business Events.
Thanks to Turing, Allied generals in the field were consistently, over long periods of the war, privy to detailed German plans before the German generals had time to implement them.
Turing, who is touted to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence, worked towards cracking Germany's Enigma code at Bletchley Park.
It will feature a quote from Turing, given in an interview to the Times newspaper on June 11, 1949: "This is only a foretaste of what is to come, and only the shadow of what is going to be."
Mr Carney said: "Alan Turing was an outstanding mathematician whose work has had an enormous impact on how we live today.
Turing was chosen following the selection process which included advice from scientific experts.
It will feature a quote from Turing, given in an interview to the Times newspaper on June 11 1949: "This is only a foretaste of what is to come, and only the shadow of what is going to be."
Making the announcement yesterday, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said: "Turing is a giant on whose shoulders so many now stand."
Often considered to be the father of computer science, Turing played a pivotal role in breaking the Nazi Enigma code.
Turing won an OBE for his work at top-secret Bletchley Park, which cracked the hugely complex Nazi Enigma code.
Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, poses for a photograph beside the concept design for the new Bank of England fifty pound banknote, featuring mathematician and scientist Alan Turing, during the presentation at the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester, north-west England.