Turing Plus

Turing Plus

Systems programming language, a concurrent descendant of Turing.

["The Turing Plus Report", R.C. Holt & J.R. Cordy, CSRI, U Toronto, Feb 1987].

Available from Holt Software Assocs, Toronto <distrib@hsa.on.ca>.
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Turing Plus views a separately compiled program the same way it views a program compiled all at once.
It also may be that b is written in Turing Plus, in which case it could be contained in a file e such as this: % File e containing body of module b body "b" % Locate the stub for module b % Body for module b module b child "d" % A child of b, which is a function function f % Parameters of f are given in b's stub result d(s + s) % Body of f, uses d end f end b
This is done in Turing Plus by having several files of the form just shown for the body of b prefixed with the same directive body "b".
Turing Plus provides a simple and efficient version of exception handlers that is not very different from the corresponding feature in Ada.
This class of features was purposely omitted from Turing (although included in Turing Plus).
The Turing Plus extension of Turing could be an alternative to Ada.
This article has introduced the Turing language and its extension to Turing Plus. Together these form a programming language of unique breadth of application, from introductory programming for children to concurrent programming on bare board microcomputers.
With the addition of Turing Plus features, the languages is now also used in upper level courses in data processing, systems software, compiler writing, and operating systems.
The Turing Plus extension of Turing supports a greater range of applications, including systems programming (where the language is an alternative to C, Modula, and Ada).
We will not explore this formal definition further, but will instead now consider the extension of the language, Turing Plus.
Turing Plus is a compatible extension of Turing, meaning that any Turing program is also a Turing Plus program.
Turing Plus provides detailed but controlled access to essentially all aspects (bits and bytes) of the run-time implementation, including pointer arithmetic and explicit emission of machine instructions.