turnover rate

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turnover rate

[′tərn‚ō·vər ‚rāt]
(chemical engineering)
In an industrial catalytic process, a value corresponding to the turnover number per specified unit of time.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The labor turnover rate is the difference between the accession rate (hiring rate) and separation rate.
Venti said the average turnover rate in New York is about 33 percent in long-term care facilities.
We hypothesised that poorly crystalline A1 and Fe oxide contents are related to turnover rates, as these relationships have been described for other volcanic soils with large organic matter stocks (Hiradate et al.
(2009) compared these two types of practices with the classification of turnover proposed by Abelson and Baysinger (1984) and found that incentive and investment practices were negatively related both to functional and dysfunctional employee turnover rates. In turn, expectation-enhancement practices were negatively related to dysfunctional turnover rates and positively related to functional turnover rates.
The turnover rates are not expected to reach pre-2008 levels, since companies are treading with greater caution in retaining their valued talent assets."
industries with relatively high worker turnover are characterized by 1.8% larger increases in export intensity following a depreciation of the dollar, while high job turnover rates limit the incentives to invest in export capacity when foreign demand grows.
Nurse turnover rates of 44.3 per cent were more than double that of Canada and the United States, the study found.
Since the annual turnover rate for truck drivers bottomed out at 39 percent during the first quarter of 2010, the rate has more than doubled for trucking companies that have more than $30 million in annual revenue, according to the American Trucking Associations of Arlington, Va.
Child Protective Services officials got an earful on Wednesday at a Senate hearing on improving the caseworker retention and turnover rates in rural communities.
Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08; (2) Average superintendent turnover rates in rural and nonrural school districts over 1998/99-2007/08 were within one-tenth of a point of each other; (3) Average superintendent turnover rates in Appalachian and non-Appalachian school districts over 1998/99-2007/08 were within one-tenth of a point of each other; (4) Statewide, superintendent turnover varied with school districts' demographic, fiscal, and achievement characteristics.
The authors explain that the connection between teacher turnover and child outcomes is complex, since the centers with high teacher turnover rates and lower levels of child outcomes also are characterized by their poor quality.
The turnover rates within health care are rather significant.