Tuscan

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Tuscan

1. of or relating to Tuscany, its inhabitants, or their dialect of Italian
2. of, denoting, or relating to one of the five classical orders of architecture: characterized by a column with an unfluted shaft and a capital and base with mouldings but no decoration
3. a native or inhabitant of Tuscany
4. any of the dialects of Italian spoken in Tuscany, esp the dialect of Florence: the standard form of Italian
http://ah.bfn.org/a/DCTNRY/t/tuscan.html
References in periodicals archive ?
Their offering ranges from run-of-the-mill chiantis through to high-end Tuscan wines and the non-vintage memoro blend of various red and white grapes from across Italy.
Tuscanisation is taken here in a broad sense to refer to the presence of Tuscan elements in writing outside of Tuscany.
In Matrimonjo di antico regime Daniela Lombardi, Associate Professor of Modern History at the University of Pisa, focuses on the highly complex problem of the way marriage was formed in Florence and the Tuscan state from 1490 to 1784.
PURITANS would preach sermons against the TVR Tuscan, lecturing the downtrodden in the pews about the danger it posed to their souls.
Here, I limit myself to a review of the contribution Cohen's book makes to early modern Tuscan history.
Mike Luck, from Stratford-upon-Avon, who owns Redditch-based Classic World Racing (CWR), has just unveiled a race car based on a 1968 TVR Tuscan after he discovered that the original moulds had been lying untouched in a barn for 20 years.
An pounds 80,000 robot milking parlour being evaluated at Coleg Sir Ger's Gelli Aur farm left a delegation from the Tuscan Parliament's agriculture committee interested but unimpressed.
These non-Tuscans, thinking they know Tuscan, have in fact corrupted it and, worse, have disseminated in their publications a language they call Tuscan but that really is the ruin of it.
Professor Moskowitz also is concerned about whether various sculptors took into account the worshipper's point of view but doesn't carry this to quite the same extreme as can be found in Marvin Trachtenberg's Dominion of the Eye (Cambridge, 1997, 185-95) or in Francis Ames-Lewis' Tuscan Marble Carving 1250-1350 (Aldershot, 1997).
Because of its exploration of literary source material, Paul Watson's The Garden of Love in Tuscan Art of the Early Renaissance (1979) has likewise inspired subsequent writing even beyond the study of deschi da parto.
The fact remains, however, that the Tuscans and Spaniards involved in these commissions were keenly aware of prevailing differences in national taste, and even of differences in artistic, social, and spiritual values.