Tutaev

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tutaev

 

(until 1918, Romanov-Borisoglebsk), a city and administrative center of Tutaev Raion, Yaroslavl Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the Volga River, 38 km northwest of the city of Yaroslavl. Landing on the right bank of the Volga. A 15-km branch line links the city with the Chebakovo station on the Yaroslavl-Rybinsk line. Population, 20,000 (1976).

In 1822, the city of Romanov (founded 14th century), situated on the left bank, and the city of Borisoglebsk (founded 15th century), situated on the right bank, were combined. Both had been district centers from 1777. The new city, Romanov-Borisoglebsk, was also made a district capital in Yaroslavl Province. Soviet power was established on Nov. 30 (Dec. 13), 1917. The city was renamed in 1918 in memory of the Red Guard I. P. Tutaev, who was killed in the Yaroslavl revolt of 1918.

Located in Tutaev is the Tul’ma Flax Combine. The city also has a garment factory and plants for the production of construction materials and the processing of food. The construction of a diesel-machine plant was begun in 1976. The center for the breeding of Romanov sheep, Tutaev has a state sheep-breeding farm and an experimental farm of the Yaroslavl Institute of Livestock Raising and Feed Production. There is a sheepskin and wool factory in the settlement of Mikliaikha, near Tutaev.

Beginning in the late 18th century, stone houses were built on the banks of the Volga according to standard designs in the classical style. Architectural monuments include the Cathedral of the Resurrection, with decorative brick on its facade (1652–78; paintings presumably 1679–80 by the artist S. Dmitriev and others), and the Krestovozdvizhenskii Cathedral Within the Walls (1658; frescoes from the 1650’s by V. Il’in and G. Kineshemtsev).

REFERENCE

Dobrovol’skaia, E., and B. Gnedovskii. Iaroslavl’; Tutaev [2nd ed.]. [Moscow, 1971.]
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were occasional protests in mono-cities (eg social protests in Pikalyovo and Tutayev) sparked by the recent slump that were 'relatively quickly and easily neutralized by focused state interventions' (Gimpelson and Kapeliushnikov, 2011, p.