Thutmose II

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Thutmose II

(thŭt`mōz, tŭt`–) or

Thothmes II

(thŏth`mēz, tōt`mĕs), reigned c.1495–1490 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, fourth ruler of the XVIII dynasty and the son and successor of Thutmose IThutmose I
or Thothmes I
, d. 1495 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, third ruler of the XVIII dynasty; successor of Amenhotep I. He became king c.1525. In a great campaign he subjugated the valley of the Nile up to the Third Cataract (below the present Dongola).
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. Unlike HatshepsutHatshepsut
, d. 1458 B.C., ruler of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; eldest daughter of Thutmose I. She managed to rule Egypt by relegating her husband (and younger half-brother), Thutmose II, to the background during his brief reign.
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, his half-sister whom he married, Thutmose II did not have a royal mother. Before long Hatshepsut gained equal power and relegated him to the background, calling herself "king." After his death, Hatshepsut became regent for Thutmose IIIThutmose III
or Thothmes III
, d. 1436 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; the successor of Thutmose II. After the death of Thutmose II, his wife Hatshepsut became regent for Thutmose III and relegated him to an inferior position for 22 years while she
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, his son by a minor queen.
References in periodicals archive ?
When her father died, Hatshepsut married the new king, her sickly half brother Tuthmosis II. A son was born, Tuthmosis III, but Hatshepsut was not the mother.
Many historians were able to prove that there was indeed an awesome pharaoh who ruled between Tuthmosis II and Tuthmosis III, and who was, in fact, a woman.
Archaeologists in 2007 identified a mummy found in a tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor about a century ago as that of Hatshepsut, who declared herself pharaoh after the death of her husband and half-brother Tuthmosis II and was known for sporting a false beard and dressing like a man.
The Discovery Channel and Zahi Hawass, Egypt's secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, will unveil details of how Hatshepsut's mummy was found in the documentary "Secrets of Egypt's Lost Queen" on July 15.The daughter of Pharaoh Tuthmosis I and wife of Tuthmosis II, her half-brother, Hatshepsut reigned from 1498 to 1483 B.C.
London's is one of a pair made for King Tuthmosis II, 1500 years before Cleopatra.
Examinations of Tuthmosis II's mummy suggest that he was an unhealthy, frail man who died in his 40s.
Hatshepsut was Tuthmosis II's half-sister (marriage to close relatives was not a problem in the Tuthmosid royal family, and this may explain the prominence given to queens in the early years of the dynasty; all were equally descended from the dynasty's heroic founder).
Paintings featuring Horus, Hathor, Tefnut, Montu and Renenutet were unearthed within the temple walls along with others showing kings Tuthmosis II and Ramses II.