Thutmose IV

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Thutmose IV

(thŭt`mōz, tŭt`–) or

Thothmes IV

(thŏth`mēz, tōt`mĕs), reigned c.1406–1398 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty, son and successor of Amenhotep IIAmenhotep II
or Amenophis II
, d. c.1420 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; son and successor of Thutmose III. Amenhotep II succeeded (1448 B.C.) as coregent and later ruled alone for 26 years.
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. He invaded Asia and Nubia, and formed alliances with independent kings neighboring his Syrian tributaries. He married a princess of MitanniMitanni
, ancient kingdom established in the 2d millennium B.C. in NW Mesopotamia. It was founded by Aryans but was later made up predominantly of Hurrians. Washshukanni was its capital.
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, who was mother of his son and successor, Amenhotep IIIAmenhotep III
or Amenophis III
, d. c.1372 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty. He succeeded his father, Thutmose IV, c.1411 B.C. His reign marks the culmination and the start of the decline of the XVIII dynasty.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Two pharaohs who came before Akhenaten - Amenhotep III and Tuthmosis IV - seem to have had similar physiques.
Tuthmosis IV had a religious experience in the middle of a sunny day, recorded in the Dream Stele - an inscription near the Great Sphinx in Giza.
(1928): The Sons of Tuthmosis IV. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, 14.
Such small cartouche-shaped plaques were made for foundation deposits from the reign of Tuthmosis IV into the Ramesside period.
Polz, who makes an impressive case for having discovered that ruler's tomb there (see his preliminary report in Egyptian Archaeology: The Bulletin of The Egypt Exploration Society 7 [1995]: 6-8) - the tombs are presented under the following groups: the early Tuthmosids, the tombs of Tuthmosis IV and Amenhotep III, the Amarna interlude, Tutankhamun and his successors, Horemheb to Sety I, Ramses II and his sons (which includes the recent rediscovery of KV 5, the tombs with the royal children), the late Nineteenth and the early Twentieth Dynasties, and the later Ramessids.
11-16), can remove with certitude Third Intermediate period and Roman material from the ceramic remains found in Tomb 18 of the Valley of the Queens and use the remaining New Kingdom material to place the tomb in the period of Amenophis II to Tuthmosis IV. Likewise, Peter French and Holeil Ghaly in the catalogue presented in "Pottery Chiefly of the Late Dynastic Period, from the Excavations by the Egyptian Antiquities Organisation at Saqqara, 1987" (pp.