Tutuila

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Tutuila

Tutuila (to͞oto͞oēˈlä), island (2010 pop. 54,359), 52 sq mi (135 sq km), largest island of American Samoa. The capital and principal harbor is Pago Pago. The island has a rugged eastern area, with a plain in the southwest. Near the center is Matafao Peak (2,141 ft/653 m), the highest point on Tutuila. Copra, canned fish, and handicrafts are the island's chief products.
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Tutuila

the largest island of American Samoa, in the SW Pacific. Chief town and port: Pago Pago. Pop.: 55 876 (2000). Area: 135 sq. km (52 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, more archaeological work needs to be done at ceramic-period highland sites so as to be able to understand the full range of behaviours practised by the earliest settlers of Tutuila Island.
Most of the known prehistoric sites on Tutuila Island date to the Monument Building Period (1000-250 BP).
Feature 4 has three radiocarbon samples that, when combined, date from 2240 to 2300 BP; Feature 5 has four radiocarbon samples that, when combined, date from 2240 to 2440 BE This indicates that these features are contemporaneous and, moreover, are the oldest highland cultural features recorded on Tutuila Island.
The shoreline subsistence fishery on Tutuila Island was first examined in the late 1970's by Hill (1978) and Wass (1980).
The 1991 island-wide subsistence catch on Tutuila Island was 439,000 pounds and was worth $768,000 at the average rate of $1.75/pound (Ponwith, 1992).
Table 1.--Catch composition of the shoreline subsistence fishery on Tutuila Island in 1991.
Second, this assessment covered only Tutuila Island, excluding the other four islands and two atolls; however, Tutuila Island accounts for >95% of the American Samoa population.
Examining causes and trends in marine trophic level change: 1500 years of fish exploitation at Fatu-ma-Futi, Tutuila Island, American Samoa.
However, recent excavations at Fatu-ma-Futi, on Tutuila Island recovered substantial mollusc and fish assemblages in a stratified sequence covering the last ca.
In the following section foraging theory hypotheses are assessed with a shellfish assemblage from the Fatu-ma-Futi Site, Tutuila Island, American Samoa.
Ceramic deposits below fifth to sixth century AD volcanic ash fall at Pava'ia'i, Tutuila Island, American Samoa: Preliminary results from Site AS-31-171.
Prehistory of Alega, Tutuila Island, American Samoa: A small residential and Basalt-industrial valley.