Tutuola


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Tutuola

Amos. 1920--97, Nigerian writer: his books include The Palm- Wine Drinkard (1952) and Pauper, Brawler and Slanderer (1987)
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alguns intelectuais foram a favor de Tutuola, analisando seu texto como um novo conceito literario, que expoe a cultura e riqueza religiosa africana, rompe os padroes esteticos e linguistico europeu e critica o consumismo ocidental, bem como os males da insercao cultural hegemonica (branca-europeia-crista) nas sociedades tradicionais da Africa.
In his chapter on Amos Tutuola, Kalliney describes a tendency among scholars to focus solely on restricted elements of one or two Tutuola texts, "overdeveloping" (158) them as a source of literary insight while ignoring the rest of the texts, not to mention the rest of Tutuola's oeuvre.
His lecture is followed by a question-and-answer session with the audience, during which the benefits of reading Ben Okri over Amos Tutuola is discussed.
I want you to cry for me!" (84) Eventually, Stabler spits on the suspect's face, and Detective Tutuola has to pull him off the suspect.
Amos Tutuola) quite realised the mischief that a catharsis between an imprisoned Dionysus and a starving Bacchus could detonate within anyone's bloodstream.
Amos Tutuola (1920-1997), a Nigerian contemporary of Achebe's, based his books on Yoruba folk tales.
The man who found the body recalls serving drinks to the victim at a wedding earlier, so Fin Tutuola (Ice T) examines the surveillance footage and discovers the teenager was also a conman.
The man who found the body recalls serving drinks to the victim at a wedding in the hotel earlier, so Fin Tutuola (Ice T) examines the surveillance footage and discovers the teenager was also a conman.
"Everyday Ghosts and the Ghostly Everyday in Amos Tutuola, Ben Okri, and Achille Mbembe." Blanco and Peeren 106-117.
This life is neither heaven nor hell, neither Hades nor Tartarus, but just somewhere, referred, sometimes, in Yoruba as "heaven" as in Daniel Fagunwa's The Forest of a Thousand Daemons, "deads' Town" as in Amos Tutuola's The Palm-wine Drinkard or some others, which differ from the Christian heaven in that in literature it is reachable on foot or by turning into a stone as is the case with Oduduwa, where live God and a people's ancestors whose influences are over those alive.