Ragnarok

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Ragnarok

(räg`nərŏk'), in Norse mythology, the doom of the gods. According to prophecy the end of the world would follow a severe ice age, in which human civilization would be destroyed. Then the gods of Asgard, led by Odin, would clash with the devastating forces of evil and chaos, led by Loki and the giants. After a fierce battle the universe itself would be destroyed by fire and a new golden age would appear, ruled by the surviving gods, including Balder. See Germanic religionGermanic religion,
pre-Christian religious practices among the tribes of Western Europe, Germany, and Scandinavia. The main sources for our knowledge are the Germania of Tacitus and the Elder Edda and the Younger Edda.
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Ragnarok

destruction of gods and all things in final battle with evil. [Norse Myth.: NCE, 1762]
References in periodicals archive ?
By July, 1934, it was the twilight of the gods, as the Finnish grain carrier, Parma, is towed into Alfred Lock, Birkenhead, back from Australia.
With Twilight of the Gods, English National Opera reached the end of the Ring cycle, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and designed by Richard Hudson.
Freidrich Nietzsche, the misunderstood 19th-century German philosopher, declared the Gotterdammerung, or Twilight of the Gods.
Tonight's Morse revival, Twilight of the Gods, does at least offer the added lustre of an appearance by John Gielgud as Oxford University Chancellor Lord Hinksey, an elderly eccentric who can't see what all the fuss is about when Welsh diva Gwladys Probert (Sheila Gish) is shot during a ceremonial procession.
In Scandinavian mythology, the Twilight of the Gods, or day of doom.
or the Twilight of the Gods, for justice was not to be banished from the earth.
The danger for Mr Brown is that his government, like Major's, is now entering a period of what the Germans would call Gotterdammerung - the twilight of the gods.
Conducted in Turin by the young Toscanini, it appeared shortly after a performance of Wagner's Twilight of the Gods, and seemed slight in comparison.