Tyana


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Tyana

(tī`ənə), town of ancient Cappadocia, at the northern foot of the Taurus range, in present S central Turkey. A powerful military fortress and a prosperous commercial center as early as the 5th cent. B.C., it was incorporated into the Roman Empire in A.D. 272. The city was the birthplace of Apollonius of Tyana. There are extensive ruins on the site.
References in classic literature ?
James Bruce was a Scotchman, of Stirlingshire, who, between 1768 and 1772, traversed all Abyssinia, as far as Lake Tyana, in search of the sources of the Nile.
Girard cites myths from nations across the world that involve hidden sacrifice and in which scapegoats emerge as gods, including Claude Levi-Strauss's Ojibwa and Tikopia tales in his Totemism, Euripides's The Bacchae, and Philostratus's Life of Apollonius of Tyana, as well as Inca and Hindu practices, Romulus and Oedipus, and many others.
22, 2011); Tyana Williams, Dash Cam Video of Deadly Traffic Stop Released, WAFB (July 22, 2009, 10:25 AM), http://www.
CE (I assume a single figure named Philostratus) holds interest for those interested in fictional romance: the Lives of the Sophists (regarding the so-called Second Sophistic), The Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the wonder-worker who travelled throughout Greece, Asia Minor, India and elsewhere, and the Heroicus, the brilliantly bizarre account of a Phoenician merchant meeting a Greek vinedresser, who through contact with his patron, the thrice-born Protesilaos, has remarkable access to the true story of what happened at Troy and its heroes.
Mead, George Robert Stow (1905), Apolonio de Tyana, traduccion de Rafael Urbano, Barcelona, Biblioteca Orientalista.
Karan tyani achya samajala already 4 muli dilya aahet aani tyamule tyana mulga honyacha hakka aahe asa mala vatata (Because they have already given four daughters to our society so they have the right to wish for a boy).
seer and wonder-worker Apollonius of Tyana is compared (as he often has been) to Jesus.
As Apollonius of Tyana said in the first century, "Man cannot be healthy in the lower part if his upper part is sick.
The only two cities of Cappadocia considered by Strabo to deserve that appellation were Caesarea (originally known as Mazaca) and Tyana, not far from the foot of the Taurus.
The tour guide thus articulates this narrative: "A traveler in Tyana, who was looking for the sage Appolonius, saw a snake enter the lower part of a man's body" (6).
90) Similarly, accordingly to the admittedly questionable account in the Historiae Augusta, the emperor Alexander Severius (208-235) positioned in his private oratory (lararium) images of Abraham and Christ before those of other renowned persons like Orpheus and Appolonius of Tyana.