Tychonic system


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Tychonic system

(tÿ-kon -ik) A model of the Solar System proposed by Tycho Brahe in the 1580s and based on observations he made in order to test the Copernican system. He concluded that the Sun and Moon revolved around the Earth, which he maintained lay at the center of the Solar System, but suggested that the other planets orbited the Sun.

Tychonic system

[tī′kän·ik ‚sis·təm]
(astronomy)
A theory of the planetary motion proposed by the astronomer Tycho Brahe in which the earth is stationary, with the sun and moon revolving about it but all the other planets revolving about the sun.
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Marius said that the observation of the stars as disks confirmed the Tychonic system, which put Earth, unmoving, at the centre of the system with the Moon and Sun orbiting it.
The principle of causality leads Kepler to take seriously the problem of the causes of the various motions; and then the principle of simplicity enables him to assert the superiority of the Copernican over the Tychonic system in so far as Copernicus has only one cause of the motions of the five planets and of the earth, whereas Tycho has two causes of motion (the sun for the five planets, and the earth for the annual motion of the solar system around the earth).
With the Tychonic system as the cleric's new favorite, they had a fallback position -- but one not entirely safe against the aesthetic appeal of the Copernican cosmology.