Tydings-McDuffie Act


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Tydings-McDuffie Act

 

a law passed by the Congress of the USA on Mar. 24, 1934, granting administrative autonomy to the Philippines for a ten-year transitional period prior to independence. The law was named after its sponsors, Senators M. Tydings and J. McDuffie.

In 1935, as provided by the act, the Philippines set up its own government, formed a national army, and adopted a constitution for an independent state. Application of the constitution, however, was limited during the transitional period: the president of the USA reserved the right to veto any law adopted by the Philippines, and the Philippine government was not permitted to conduct its own foreign policy. In 1946 the USA agreed to grant independence to the Philippines. Yet in 1946 and 1947, it imposed on the Philippines, in violation of the pledges contained in the Tydings-McDuffie Act, economic and military treaties that represented an infringement of the country’s sovereignty.

References in periodicals archive ?
The US Congress promptly enacted a new law, the Tydings-McDuffie Act. The Act stipulated that the President of the United States was to surrender all sovereignty and recognize the independence of the Philippines on July 4, 1946.
Admittedly, I would say very little about Quezon's time as president-- his efforts in helping secure independence from the US, pushing for passage of the Tydings-McDuffie Act; how he managed to evade capture by the Japanese at the outbreak of the war in the Pacific.
This was accomplished through the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934 that drafted mechanisms for the establishment of a constitution.
Some senior officers in the 1930s, coinciding with the passage of the Tydings-McDuffie Act (1934), argued for expedited Philippines independence and US withdrawal back into the strategic triangle.
The Tydings-McDuffie Act, granting independence to the Philippines, was passed by Congress.
Other laws included the 1917 Immigration Act, which prohibited Asian Indian immigration; the 1924 Immigration Quota Act, which halted all immigration from mainland Asia; and the 1934 Tydings-McDuffie Act which restricted Filipino immigration.
The Tydings-McDuffie Act was finally passed by the US Congress, providing the Filipinos a 10-year-period of preparation toward complete independence.
The free flow of Filipino migrants to Hawaii and other states came to an end in 1934, when the Tydings-McDuffie Act put Filipinos in the aliens category, subject to immigration restrictions like everyone else.
Past Philippine administrations treated the United States as a 'Big Brother.' Agreements between the two countries like the ones on mutual defense and trade and investment, and such laws as the Tydings-McDuffie Act and the Hare-Hawes-Cutting Act were designed to establish long friendship between the two countries.
His accomplishments as a statesman include the ratification of the Tydings-McDuffie Act, which led to Philippine self-government and eventual independence from the United States," Presidential Spokesman Edwin Lacierda said.
I'm always surprised when I mention nuggets of Filipino American history like the Tydings-McDuffie Act, which changed the status of Filipinos from American nationals to just plain Filipino-and subject to deportation.
The US pledged eventual recognition of Philippine independence in the Jones Law of 1916; the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1933 set a ten-year transition period which, however, was interrupted by World War II.