Typhlitis


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Typhlitis

 

(also cecitis), inflammation of the cecum. Typhlitis results from failure of the cecum to empty itself of its contents—for example, because of lengthening or prolapse of the intestine or in the case of a tumor—or because of prolonged retention and excessive fermentation or putrefaction of its contents. Less frequently, typhlitis is a complication of acute appendicitis occurring when the inflammation moves from the vermiform appendix to the intestinal wall. The symptoms of typhlitis are pain in the right abdomen, swelling of the cecum, alternating constipation and diarrhea, and increased body temperature. The condition may be acute or chronic. The patient’s stools, which are analyzed for diagnostic purposes, may contain mucus and sometimes pus and blood. Treatment is the same as for colitis. A spare diet and enemas are prescribed. Surgery is performed in some cases.

References in periodicals archive ?
Foreman, "Neutropenic enterocolitis (typhlitis) in a pediatric renal transplant patient.
Associated typhlitis, an uncommon finding with ALA, was present in only 6% patients.
Typhlitis during second-line chemotherapy with pemetrexed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A case report.
CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed cecal wall thickening associated with fat stranding and right paracolic gutter fluid collection--findings consistent with typhlitis. Labs revealed an ANC of less than 500 cells/[micro]L.
Right lower abdominal pain due to involvement of other viscera like urinary tract infection, ureteric stone, acute gastroenteritis, Meckel's diverticulitis, disease of the urogenital systems, intussusception, Crohn's enteritis, caecal typhlitis, gynaecological disorders--pelvic inflammatory disease, ruptured ectopic, torsion of ovarian cysts.
Necropsy examination revealed congested liver, hypertrophied kidneys, peritonitis, severe typhlitis suggestive of coligranuloma, pneumonia, and airsacculitis, which are typical signs of colisepticemia.
The gastrointestinal system must also be carefully examined as typhlitis or neutropenic enterocolitis is a common cause of severe infection.
Histopathologic examination showed severe, diffuse, necrotizing typhlitis; mild to moderate enterocolitis; and septicemia.
These opportunistic pathogens include mycobacteria (tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare), viruses (CMV), parasites (Cryptosporidium) and, in the setting of neutropenia, typhlitis (neutropenic colitis, Figure 19).
Appendicular abscess or mass, ileocaecal tuberculosis, carcinoma caecum, mesenteric adenitis, iliac nodes, typhlitis, Crohn's disease, actinomycosis, distended gallblader, ovarian cysts, fibroid uterus, tubo-ovarian mass, occasionally intussusception, amoeboma, diverticular disease.
On gross pathologic examination, the geese were found to have hemorrhagic-to-necrotic inflammation of the large intestine (colon and rectum) and fibrinonecrotic typhlitis accompanied by severe degeneration.