Typhoid Mary


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Related to Typhoid Mary: typhoid fever, Bloody Mary

Typhoid Mary

See Mallon, Mary.

Typhoid Mary

(Mary Mallon, 1870–1938) unwitting carrier of typhus; suffered 23-year quarantine. [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 354]
See: Disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, the carrier sees no advertisements and doesn't know that he or she is infected, just like symptomless Typhoid Mary.
What about Typhoid Mary (assuming the Board of Health correctly diagnosed her)?
In 2000, he completed Typhoid Mary, a chamber opera that he had begun in 1991 and his nine and a half minute orchestral piece, Cloud Walking has earned him his spnw shortlisting.
Nineteen-year old Cal arrives in New York City to attend college, but is seduced by too many Bahamalama Dingdongs into sex with a black-haired stranger and becomes a carrier of the parasite, making him the perfect vampire hunter because, like Typhoid Mary, his condition is rare.
Macy) is the Typhoid Mary of gamblers, a player so unlucky his mere touch can jinx other bettors and send a run of luck stumbling to the floor.
In addition, the Grierson Trust gave a lifetime award to Jonathan Gill, who made many historical documentaries including Typhoid Mary (1994) and Coming Home (1996), and who earlier this year produced a series Historians of Genius--In Their Own Words, which presented the work of historians such as Macaulay, Gibbon and Carlyle, setting them to a wide, original and witty range of visuals.
Based on the case of Mary, a modern day (fictional) counterpart of "HIV Jane" is constructed, and the lens of agency developed with Typhoid Mary can be applied to HIV-positive sex workers and their role in HIV prevention.
He sounds as if he'd rather be called Typhoid Mary.
Nova is Typhoid Mary until they solve these problems.
A cook in the New York City era, Typhoid Mary was arrested in 1907 (after killing a mere three people with her typhoid germs) and spent most of the next quarter-century in an isolation unit on North Brother Island.
When officials traced more infections back to her, and she refused to cooperate with their infection-control efforts, the health director sent her back to the island for the rest of her life, where she became the famous Typhoid Mary.
Cincinnati now has its own version of Typhoid Mary.