Typhon

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Typhon

(tī`fŏn) or

Typhoeus

(tīfē`əs), in Greek mythology, fierce and monstrous son of Gaea. He was the father of Echidna—a monster half woman and half dragon—and of Cerberus, Hydra, the Sphinx, and the Chimera. Typhon was so frightful that Zeus set him afire and buried him alive under Mt. Aetna.
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typhon

[′tī‚fän]
(engineering acoustics)
A diaphragm horn which operates under the influence of compressed air or steam. Also spelled tyfon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Typhon

fire-breathing colossus. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 373]

Typhon

tallest of the giants; his arms and legs ended in serpents. [Gk. Myth: Benét, 1034]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.