Tzara


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Tzara

Tristan, original name Samuel Rosenstock. 1896--1963, French poet and essayist, born in Romania, best known as the founder of Dada: author of The Approximate Man (1931).
References in periodicals archive ?
Tzara, Tzara against Breton, Breton against Picabia; Ball was already
The story of Tzara's triumphal arrival in the French capital the following year has often been told.
The former cubist painter Francis Picabia, who had been leading a similar movement in New York with Marcel Duchamp, joined Tzara ' s group in 1918.
Unlike Huelsenbeck, who searched for the best stuff he could find to the point that a reader could barely encounter a dull entry, Tzara opened a field of self-promotion, of art-world name making, and people from Louis Aragon to Fried-Hardy Worm (as the alphabetical opening page would have it) came up with cutely elaborate jokes, collages, photographs, drawings, and puerile shouts that sit flatly on the page.
I learnt this, and ways of mapping it all, early on when still in my teens from reading Ezra Pound, and then a year or two later from Tristan Tzara, Jorge Louis Borges, and John Ashbery.
We read about his interests in anthropology and art, his brilliant sketches of foreign lands, people, and landscapes; his friendship with the great minds of the world (Picasso, Gide, Saint-John Perse, Apollinaire, Breton, Tzara, Matic, Rakic, Sumanovic, Crnjanski, and many more.
Humour gets a brief look-in in Jean-Marc Maura's paper on Andre Breton and Tristan Tzara, and their cults of African and Oceanian art.
TRISTAN TZARA was the author of the first Dada texts La Premiere