U-NII

(redirected from U-nii band)

U-NII

(1) (UNique Ingredient Identifier) See healthcare IT.

(2) (Unlicensed-National Information Infrastructure) A part of the national spectrum sanctioned by the FCC in 1997 that does not require a license for short-range wireless use. One of the purposes for U-NII was to enable schools, libraries and healthcare organizations in rural areas to more easily connect to the Internet and private, high-speed networks.

Radar Has Priority
U-NII channels 52 through 140 (5.26-5.7 GHz) require transmitting devices to use dynamic frequency selection (DFS) to avoid conflicts with radar pulses. A DFS frequency must be clear of radar for one minute before using it, and if radar is detected on the current channel, the transmitter must switch to another channel, also free of radar for one minute. See ISM band and WiSA.

U-NNI BANDSIndoor/  MaxFrequency     Outdoor  PowerRange (GHz)   Usage    (mW)  DFS?

 5.150-5.250   In       50    no

 5.250-5.350   In/Out  250    yes

 5.470-5.725   In/Out  250    yes

 5.725-5.825   Out    1000    no
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Summit utilizes the newly opened 5GHz U-NII band spectrum to eliminate interference with common household wireless devices such as Wi-Fi networks, cordless phones, bluetooth devices and microwaves in the crowded 2.4GHz and 5.8GHz spaces.
Due to the rapidly growing demand for broadband wireless communication, the operating frequency is moving toward the 5 GHz U-NII band. With a maximum data rate of 54 Mb/s, the IEEE 802.11a wireless LAN (WLAN) standard specifies 300 MHz allocation of spectrum in the 5 GHz band that is divided into three sub-bands, as shown in Figure 1.
The Tsunami operates in frequency ranges of 5,250 to 5,350 MHz and 5,725 to 5,825 MHz (U-NII Band).
The U-NII Band would allow individuals and organizations to purchase computers with radio communications capabilities and sufficient bandwidth to support voice and video communications as well as much higher data transmission rates than those available from most facilities today (up to twenty megabits per second).
Due to the fast growing demand for broadband wireless communications, the operating frequency band is moving toward the 5 GHz U-NII band. The advantage of combining baseband and the RF front-end on a single chip for cost savings is strongly desired for highly integrated systems-on-chip (SoC) applications.
The RadioLAN 10 radio operates in the 5.775 GHz U-NII band (unlicensed) using narrow-band microwave transmission with two-level network access control and optional RSA encryption.
Due to the fast growing demand for broadband wireless communications, the operating frequency band is moving toward the 5 GHz U-NII band. The advantage of combining baseband and the RF front-end on one single chip for cost savings is strongly desired for highly integrated systems-on-chip (SoC) applications.
This article presents a fully-integrated 5 GHz CMOS voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO)for a U-NII band 802.lla WLAN application.
Teledyne Wireless displayed its 5.725 to 5.825' GHz GaAs MMIC U-NII band power amplifier that provides 22 dB of gain and +28.5 dBm of linear output power with an IP3 of +43 dBm.
Beginning in 1997, the FCC continually took actions that would eventually make available 555 megahertz of spectrum in the 5 GHz band which is divided into several sections referred to as U-NII bands. The UNII-1 band 5.15-5.25 GHz was originally designated for indoor operations, UNII-2 and UNII-2A extended bands 5.25-5.35 GHz are for indoor and outdoor operations, and the UNII-3/ISM band 5.725-5.825 GHz is intended for outdoor bridge products and may be used for indoor WLANs as well.
When used with the SMT911 RF module data may be transmitted at up to 54Mb/s on any standard 20MHz-wide channel in the 2.4GHz ISM or 5GHz U-NII bands. The core contains both transmit and receive chains and interfaces directly to other DSP or FPGA modules provided by the hardware platform.