Federal Aviation Administration

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Federal Aviation Administration

(FAA), component of the U.S. Department of Transportation that sets standards for the air-worthiness of all civilian aircraft, inspects and licenses them, and regulates civilian and military air traffic through its air traffic control centers. It investigates air accidents and in response may establish new rules, for example, on de-icing and air-frame inspections. It also promotes the development of a national system of airports. Established as a federal agency in 1958 to regulate air commerce, it assumed many of the functions of the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB; est. as the Civil Aeronautics Authority, 1938) and the Airways Modernization Board. The agency became part of the newly formed Dept. of Transportation in 1967. In 1981–82, it took over authority for the limited regulation of domestic routes and fares from the CAB, which was abolished by 1985.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

The arm of the U.S. Department of Transportation responsible for the promotion, regulation, and safety of civil aviation and for the safe and efficient use of airspace, which is shared by civil and military aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
Airline companies, however, do not decide when their planes can takeoff and land, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration does.
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has purchased PROGNOSIS systems management software from Integrated Research (IR) to manage its recently updated international weather messaging system.
For example, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), historically has provided training for airport police officers.
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it was downgrading Trinidad & Tobago to a Category 2 rating from Category 1 after a reassessment of the country's civil aviation authority found it fell short of standards set
Now the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is sponsoring a congressionally mandated review that is being conducted by a National Academy of Sciences committee.
Once approved for use by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Moller envisions the vehicle will fly as high as 7,576 m (25,000 ft).
Boeing announced the 787-10 Dreamliner received an amended type certificate, ATC, from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, clearing the airplane for commercial service.
26, 2011, both the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and the European Aviation Safety Agency granted type certificates for the all-new jetliner.
Global revenues from the private launch business--not counting tens of billions of dollars from the economic impact of satellite design, construction and support--is $2 billion a year, says the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. More than 27 satellites will be launched each year through 2011, it says.