U.S. Robotics


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U.S. Robotics

(U.S. Robotics, Inc., Schaumburg, IL, www.usr.com) An earlier analog modem manufacturer highly regarded for its quality products. U.S. Robotics (USR) was an innovative company that manufactured its own chipsets (data pumps), and its Sportster models were the best-selling modems in the world. USR's HST protocol was a high-speed, reliable protocol before V.32bis became a modem standard in 1991.

In 1997, USR became part of 3Com in the largest merger in data networking history. In 2000, it was spun off as a private, independent company formed by 3Com, Accton Technology Corporation and NatSteel Electronics, Ltd. In 2013, UNICOM Global acquired the company. See 3Com and analog modem.


The Sportster Modem
As people went online by the droves in the 1990s, modems from U.S. Robotics were a common sight. (Image courtesy of 3Com Corporation.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign firms in allied countries will likely seek to partner with leading U.S. robotics businesses as they develop their own systems, he noted.
U.S. Robotics products always connect at the highest possible rate to provide the best speeds in mixed mode networking environments from 22 Mbps, 54 Mbps, 100 Mbps and now up to 125 Mbps.
U.S. Robotics' Wireless USB Adapter saves users the trouble of opening the case of their desktop computer and eliminates the need for tools to install the equipment.
For customers of select U.S. Robotics products in North America, Symantec's Norton Internet Security 2003 is bundled with their analog, DSL and home networking devices.
Under the terms of the agreement, U.S. Robotics will package Propel Accelerator 3.0 with its line of analog modems.
In 1997, Xerox filed a lawsuit charging that Palm (then called U.S. Robotics) used elements of Unistrokes, Xerox's handwriting recognition technology, in Graffiti software without a license.
All of which may explain positive signs in the U.S. robotics market, the world's second largest after Japan's:
3Com had purchased Palm from modem-maker U.S. Robotics in 1997, and spun it off as a separate company in 2000.
This was also true for dial-up modems when two 56 KBPS standards were introduced: Rockwell's (now Conexant) K56Flex and U.S. Robotics' (now 3Com) x2.
The Illinois-based modem provider U.S. Robotics has partnered with the chipset supplier GlobeSpan Inc to launch its first DSL modem.