UNIVAC I

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UNIVAC I

(UNIVersal Automatic Computer) The first mass produced and commercially successful computer, introduced in 1951 by Remington Rand. Over 40 systems were sold. The UNIVAC I's memory was made of mercury-filled acoustic delay lines that held 1,000 12-digit numbers. It used magnetic tapes that stored 1MB of data at a density of 128 cpi. In 1952, the computer predicted Eisenhower's victory over Stevenson, and, for a while, UNIVAC was synonymous with "computer." UNIVAC I machines were in use until the early 1960s. See delay line memory and early memory.


UNIVAC I
The circuitry that filled up the walk-in CPU of the UNIVAC I now fits on your finger. This photo was the news coverage of Eisenhower's prediction. (Image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)







Very Impressive Console
John Mauchly, one of the UNIVAC's designers, is leaning on the "high-tech" console that wowed audiences. Notice the typewriter (right) and oscilloscope (left). (Image courtesy of Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.)
References in periodicals archive ?
"It was a 1,000-word mercury tank 2 memory with vacuum tubes," said Montague, regarding the tanks of mercury used for UNIVAC 1's memory.
"Programming on the Univac 1: A Woman's Account." IEEE: Annals of the History of Computing 25.1 (2003): 48-59.
He noted that the data center's Univac 1 (UNIVersal Automatic Computer 1) used tape instead of punch cards, which was the standard of that time.
Ironically, this function mirrors the intended use of the initial purchase of the first commercially available digital computer, the UNIVAC 1, by the US Census Bureau in 1951.
* Insurance carriers were among the first companies to adopt mainframe computers, buying the UNIVAC 1 in the early 1950s.
The technology used by insurance carriers, like the computing technology of much of corporate America, has come a long way since the early '50s when carriers brought their first UNIVAC 1 mainframes from a manufacturer then known as Remington Rand.
In 1962, Franklin Life bought a second UNIVAC 1 mainframe for $87,000.
Soon afterwards, America's first commercial computer, UNIVAC 1, is delivered to the Census Bureau.
Compared to the massive UNIVAC 1, the 650 could actually fit in one room.
Invention: Univac 1, made by Remington Rand, is the first commercially available computer.