UNIVAC I


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UNIVAC I

(UNIVersal Automatic Computer) The first commercially successful computer, introduced in 1951 by Remington Rand. Over 40 systems were sold. Its memory was made of mercury-filled acoustic delay lines that held 1,000 12-digit numbers. It used magnetic tapes that stored 1MB of data at a density of 128 cpi. In 1952, it predicted Eisenhower's victory over Stevenson, and UNIVAC became synonymous with computer (for a while). UNIVAC I's were in use up until the early 1960s. See delay line memory and early memories.


UNIVAC I
The circuitry that filled up the walk-in CPU of the UNIVAC I, now fits on your finger. The UNIVAC I made history in 1952 when it predicted Eisenhower's victory. This picture is news coverage of that event. (Image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)







Very Impressive Console
John Mauchly, one of the UNIVAC's designers, is leaning on the "high-tech" console that wowed audiences in the 1950s. Check out the typewriter (right) and the oscilloscope (left). (Image courtesy of Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.)
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Although the first commercial American computer, the UNIVAC I, was sold to the U.
The Computer Science Conference (CSC) attendees in Louisville, Kentucky were privileged to inspect a recently renovated UNIVAC I.
The UNIVAC I was manufactured circa 1950 and marked the beginning of commercial computing.
The California State Assembly today honored Unisys Corporation on the 50th Anniversary of the company's introduction of UNIVAC I, the nation's first mass-produced commercial computer, which opened the "Computer Age" and ignited the high tech industry so important to California's economy.
5, on Information Technology and Transportation; and Assembly Member Manny Diaz, 23rd Assembly District and Chair of the Assembly Information Technology Subcommittee of the Jobs, Economic Development and the Economy; commends Unisys for "making the very first mass-produced computer, UNIVAC I, opening a whole new world of possibilities.
Mauchly started a company which had the goal of producing computers to be offered for sale in the commercial marketplace," and "after many years of struggle, they produced the UNIVAC I computer which was delivered to its first customer, the United States Census Bureau, in 1951.
Unisys Corporation today issued a public apology for the many human inconveniences resulting from its invention of UNIVAC I, the world's first commercial computer, introduced on June 14, 1951.
In 1952, UNIVAC I gained widespread public attention when it correctly predicted the Eisenhower landslide in the US Presidential election.
SIDEBAR: FACTS ABOUT UNIVAC I, COMPARISONS TO TODAY'S STATE-OF-THE ART TECHNOLOGY
In 1951, the Bureau purchased the UNIVAC I -- the first large-scale commercial computer -- to tabulate the results of the 1952 census.