Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

(CDC), agency of the U.S. Public Health Service since 1973, with headquarters in Atlanta; it was established in 1946 as the Communicable Disease Center. The CDC is the federal agency responsible for administering national programs for the prevention and control of communicable and vector-borne diseases and for developing and implementing programs for dealing with environmental health problems. It also directs quarantine activities and conducts epidemiological research, and it provides consultation on an international basis for the control of preventable diseases. The 11 centers, institutes, and offices of the agency include the centers for chronic disease prevention and health promotion, environmental health, health statistics, infectious diseases, injury prevention and control, immunizations, and occupational safety and health.
References in periodicals archive ?
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the spread of genital herpes (HSV-2) to be at epidemic levels.
According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MRSA infections are common causes of hospital-acquired infections and a limited number of drugs remain effective against these infections.
The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is spearheaded by the World Health Organization, Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).