USPS


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USPS

(1) (Uninterruptible Switching Power Supply) A power supply for a computer that contains its own battery and uninterruptible power supply (UPS) circuitry. See power supply and UPS.

(2) (United States Post Office) In other words, "snail mail."
References in periodicals archive ?
For years, we have seen grim predictions from USPS warning of its pending financial demise.
USPS Senior Public Relations Representative Sue Brennan told Logistics Management that the USPS has been working with Amazon for months on a negotiated service agreement for this service.
The USPS spends more than $64 billion annually on vendor products and services--a fact that Christopher discovered when she started doing business with the organization.
The energy services provider partnered with the USPS New York Metropolitan Area District in 1997 to improve energy efficiency at its facilities.
Smith continued, "PLANET (Postal Alpha Numeric Encoding Technique) Codes are used to provide USPS CONFIRM service.
The current rate case saga began during the early morning meeting of the USPS Board of Governors on September 11.
The problem for the USPS is one that it's not used to handling - competition.
The plastic pallets were selected based on their ability to meet the USPS criteria (including ability to support a minimum load of 2500 lb and strength retention at different temperatures), as well as their outright advantages over wood or structural foam.
customers to prepare mail in ways that increase efficiency for USPS processing methods, the Shape-Based Pricing initiative moves from a pure weight determination factor for postage costs to one that combines size, thickness and weight.
USPS has reported that the declining economy accelerated declines in mail volume in fiscal year 2008 and flattened revenues despite postal rate increases.
The Postal Service presented a Quality Supplier Award to ConEdison Solutions at a reception held at USPS headquarters.
Most "explanations" of postal reform go on about "modernization, streamlining, improving productivity, giving USPS the ability and flexiblity to develop innovative new services and respond to changing market conditions.