urinary tract infection

(redirected from UTI)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

urinary tract infection

[‚yu̇r·ə‚ner·ē ′trakt in‚fek·shən]
(medicine)
An inflammatory process occurring in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or adjacent structures that occurs when microorganisms (usually Escherichia coli) enter through the urethra.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"These are exciting times, and we are thrilled to be working with a long-standing player in the financial services industry such as UTI MF.
The current regulatory shift in the United States including Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program coupled with Affordable Care Act and also Medicare initiatives for penalizing unnecessary patient readmissions is likely to drive the UTI market in the US.
Having too much sexual intercourse can increase your risk of UTI. Such activity exposes the body to bacteria and allow it to travel from the anus and genitals into the urinary tract.
The study showed that about 11 patients per 1,000 developed a UTI in the hospital.
Following a backlash from former housemates of BBNaija and a number of people, Uti has rephrased the success statement he made about Cee c.
There was no significant difference of prevalence of UTI between moderate and severe malnutrition (P=0.57195) (Table V).
About Goodbye UTI: Goodbye UTI is all natural, GMO free and manufactured in Atlanta, GA by Catalyst Nutraceuticals, an FDA approved facility.
The bloodstream infection rate was 2.9% for patients who were not prescribed antibiotics ever or prior to an infection occurring, 2.2% in those who were prescribed antibiotics on a deferred basis, and 0.2% in those who were prescribed antibiotics immediately, meaning during their first visit to a general practitioner for a UTI or on the same day (P less than .001).
Most UTIs are caused by bacteria and can be treated by antibiotics.
In addition low socioeconomic status, history of recurrent UTI, diabetes mellitus and urinary tract abnormalities have also been shown to have a positive association4,5.
The purpose of this pilot study was to examine potential factors that influence a healthcare practitioner's ability to distinguish between ABU and UTI, and how those factors impact their clinical decisions to treat.
The meta-analysis found a 26% reduction in risk of UTI recurrence for healthy women who received cranberry compared to those who did not.